Cover photo

Transportation Improvement Program
Federal Fiscal Years 2024–28

Boston Region MPO

DRAFT FOR PUBLIC COMMENT, APRIL 20, 2023

Cover photo

Contents

Executive Summary
Chapter 1: 3C Transportation Planning and the Boston Region Metropolitan Planning Organization
Chapter 2: The TIP Process
Chapter 3: Summary of Highway and Transit Programming
Chapter 4: Performance Analysis
Chapter 5: Determination of Air Qulaity Conformity
Chapter 6: Transportation Equity Performance

Appendices

Certification of the Boston Region MPO Transportation Planning Process

 

 

 


Prepared by
The Central Transportation Planning Staff:
Staff to the Boston Region Metropolitan Planning Organization

Directed by the Boston Region Metropolitan Planning Organization,
which is composed of the

Massachusetts Department of Transportation
Metropolitan Area Planning Council
Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority
MBTA Advisory Board
Massachusetts Port Authority
Regional Transportation Advisory Council
City of Boston
City of Beverly
City of Everett
City of Framingham
City of Newton
City of Somerville
Town of Acton
Town of Brookline
Town of Burlington
Town of Hull
Town of Norwood
Federal Highway Administration (nonvoting)
Federal Transit Administration (nonvoting)


This document was funded in part through grants from the US Department of Transportation. Its contents do not necessarily reflect the official views or policies of the US Department of Transportation.

 

 


Cover photo

 

NOTICE OF NONDISCRIMINATION RIGHTS AND PROTECTIONS

Meeting locations are accessible to people with disabilities and are near public transportation. Upon request (preferably two weeks in advance of the meeting), every effort will be made to provide accommodations such as assistive listening devices, materials in accessible formats and in languages other than English, and interpreters in American Sign Language and other languages. Please contact the MPO staff at 857.702.3700 (voice), 617.570.9193 (TTY), 617.570.9192 (fax), or eharvey@ctps.org.

The Boston Region Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) operates its programs, services, and activities in compliance with federal nondiscrimination laws including Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title VI), the Civil Rights Restoration Act of 1987, and related statutes and regulations. Title VI prohibits discrimination in federally assisted programs and requires that no person in the United States of America shall, on the grounds of race, color, or national origin (including limited English proficiency), be excluded from participation in, denied the benefits of, or be otherwise subjected to discrimination under any program or activity that receives federal assistance. Related federal nondiscrimination laws administered by the Federal Highway Administration, Federal Transit Administration, or both, prohibit discrimination on the basis of age, sex, and disability. The Boston Region MPO considers these protected populations in its Title VI Programs, consistent with federal interpretation and administration. In addition, the Boston Region MPO provides meaningful access to its programs, services, and activities to individuals with limited English proficiency, in compliance with U.S. Department of Transportation policy and guidance on federal Executive Order 13166.

The Boston Region MPO also complies with the Massachusetts Public Accommodation Law, M.G.L. c 272 sections 92a, 98, 98a, which prohibits making any distinction, discrimination, or restriction in admission to, or treatment in a place of public accommodation based on race, color, religious creed, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, disability, or ancestry. Likewise, the Boston Region MPO complies with the Governor's Executive Order 526, section 4, which requires that all programs, activities, and services provided, performed, licensed, chartered, funded, regulated, or contracted for by the state shall be conducted without unlawful discrimination based on race, color, age, gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, religion, creed, ancestry, national origin, disability, veteran's status (including Vietnam-era veterans), or background.

A complaint form and additional information can be obtained by contacting the MPO or at http://www.bostonmpo.org/mpo_non_discrimination. To request this information in a different language or in an accessible format, please contact

Title VI Specialist
Boston Region MPO
10 Park Plaza, Suite 2150
Boston, MA 02116
civilrights@ctps.org

By telephone:
857.702.3700(voice)

For people with hearing or speaking difficulties, connect through the state MassRelay service:

Relay Using TTY or Hearing Carry-over: 800.439.2370
Relay Using Voice Carry-over: 866.887.6619
Relay Using Text to Speech: 866.645.9870

For more information, including numbers for Spanish speakers, visit https://www.mass.gov/massrelay


Contact MPO staff:

By mail:

Ethan Lapointe
TIP Manager, Central Transportation Planning Staff
10 Park Plaza, Suite 2150
Boston, MA 02116

By telephone:

857.702.3703 (voice)

For people with hearing or speaking difficulties, connect through the state MassRelay service:

Relay Using TTY or Hearing Carry-over: 800.439.2370
Relay Using Voice Carry-over: 866.887.6619
Relay Using Text to Speech: 866.645.9870

For more information, including numbers for Spanish speakers, visit https://www.mass.gov/massrelay

By email:

elapointe@ctps.org

 

 

 


[SIGNED CERTIFICATION coming soon]

 

 


 

ABBREVIATIONS

 

Abbreviations

 

Abbreviation

Term

3C

continuous, comprehensive, cooperative [metropolitan transportation planning process]

AAB

Massachusetts Architectural Access Board

AADT

average annual daily traffic

ABP

Accelerated Bridge Program [MassDOT program]

AC

advance construction

ACS

American Community Survey [US Census Bureau data]

ADA

Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990

AFC

automated fare collection

ALI

Activity Line Item

ARPA

American Rescue Plan Act

BIL

Bipartisan Infrastructure Law

BFP

Bridge Formula Program [federal funding program]

BR

Bridge [highway investment program]

BRT

bus rapid transit

CA/T

Central Artery/Tunnel [project also known as “the Big Dig”]

CAA

Clean Air Act

CAAA

Clean Air Act Amendments

CARES Act

Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act

CATA

Cape Ann Transportation Authority

CECP

Massachusetts Clean Energy and Climate Plan

CFR

Code of Federal Regulations

CIP

Capital Investment Plan [MassDOT]

CMAQ

Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality [federal funding program]

CMR

Code of Massachusetts Regulations

CMP

Congestion Management Process

CNG

compressed natural gas

CO

carbon monoxide

CO2

carbon dioxide

CPT–HST

Coordinated Public Transit–Human Services Transportation Plan

CRRSAA

Coronavirus Response and Relief Supplemental Appropriations Act

CTPS

Central Transportation Planning Staff

CY

calendar year

DCR

Department of Conservation and Recreation

DEP

Department of Environmental Protection [Massachusetts]

DOD

United States Department of Defense

DOT

department of transportation

DVR

digital video recorder

EB

eastbound

EDTTT

excessive delay threshold travel time

EJ

environmental justice

EO

executive order

EOEEA

Massachusetts Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs

EOHED

Massachusetts Executive Office of Housing and Economic Development

EPA

United States Environmental Protection Agency

EPDO

equivalent property damage only [a traffic-related index]

EV

electric vehicle

FARS

Fatality Analysis and Reporting System [FHWA]

FAST Act

Fixing America’s Surface Transportation Act

FEMA

Federal Emergency Management Agency

FFY

federal fiscal year

FHWA

Federal Highway Administration

FMCB

MBTA Fiscal and Management Control Board

FMLA

Federal Land Management Agency

FR

Federal Register

FTA

Federal Transit Administration

GANS

grant anticipation notes [municipal bond financing]

GHG

greenhouse gas

GWSA

Global Warming Solutions Act of 2008 [Massachusetts]

HIP

Highway Infrastructure Program [federal funding program]

HOV

high-occupancy vehicle

HSIP

Highway Safety Improvement Program [federal funding program]

I

Interstate

ICC

Inner Core Committee [MAPC municipal subregion]

IRI

International Roughness Index

ITS

intelligent transportation systems

LED

light-emitting diode

LEP

limited English proficiency

LF

local funds

LOTTR

level of travel time ratio

LRTP

Long-Range Transportation Plan [MPO certification document]

MAGIC

Minuteman Advisory Group on Interlocal Coordination [MAPC municipal subregion]

MAP-21

Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act

MAPC

Metropolitan Area Planning Council

MARPA

Massachusetts Association of Regional Planning Agencies

MART

Montachusett Regional Transit Authority

MassDOT

Massachusetts Department of Transportation

Massport

Massachusetts Port Authority

MBTA

Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority

MCRT

Mass Central Rail Trail

MOVES

Motor Vehicle Emissions Simulator [EPA air quality model]

MPO

metropolitan planning organization

MOU

memorandum of understanding

MWRC

MetroWest Regional Collaborative [MAPC municipal subregion]

MWRTA

MetroWest Regional Transit Authority

NAAQS

National Ambient Air Quality Standards

NB

northbound

NBI

National Bridge Inventory

NEVI

National Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Program [federal funding program]

NFA

Non-federal aid

NGBP

Next Generation Bridge Program [MassDOT program]

NH DOT

New Hampshire Department of Transportation

NHFP

National Highway Freight Program [federal funding program]

NHPP

National Highway Performance Program [federal funding program]

NHS

National Highway System

NHTSA

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

NMCOG

Northern Middlesex Council of Governments

NOx

nitrogen oxides

NPMRDS

National Performance Measure Research Data Set [FHWA]

NSPC

North Suburban Planning Council [MAPC municipal subregion]

NSTF

North Shore Task Force [MAPC municipal subregion]

NTD

National Transit Database

OF

other federal funding

O&M

operations and management

PBPP

performance-based planning and programming

PEN

penalty funding

PHED

peak hours of excessive delay

PL

metropolitan planning funds [FHWA] or public law funds

PM

particulate matter

PNF

project need form [MassDOT]

ppm

parts per million

PRC

Project Review Committee [MassDOT]

PSAC

Project Selection Advisory Council [MassDOT]

PSI

Pavement Serviceability Index

PTASP

Public Transportation Agency Safety Plan

RITIS

Regional Integrated Transportation Information System

RRIF

Railroad Rehabilitation and Improvement Financing

RTA

regional transit authority

RTAC

Regional Transportation Advisory Council [of the Boston Region MPO]

RTACAP

Regional transit authority capital funds

SB

southbound

SFY

state fiscal year

SHSP

Strategic Highway Safety Plan

SIP

State Implementation Plan

SMS

safety management systems

SOV

single-occupant vehicle

SPR

Statewide Planning and Research

SRTS

Safe Routes to School [federal program]

SSC

South Shore Coalition [MAPC municipal subregion]

STRAHNET

Strategic Highway Network

STBG

Surface Transportation Block Grant Program [federal funding program]

STIP

State Transportation Improvement Program

SWAP

South West Advisory Planning Committee [MAPC municipal subregion]

TAM

Transit Asset Management Plan

TAMP

Transportation Asset Management Plan

TAP

Transportation Alternatives Program [federal funding program]

TAZ

transportation analysis zone

TBD

to be determined

TCM

transportation control measure

TE

transportation equity

TERM

Transit Economic Requirements Model [FTA]

TFPC

Total Federal Participating Cost

TIFIA

Transportation Infrastructure and Innovation Act

TIP

Transportation Improvement Program [MPO certification document]

TMA

transportation management association

TRIC

Three Rivers Interlocal Council [MAPC municipal subregion]

TSP

transit signal priority

TTTR

Truck Travel Time Reliability Index

ULB

useful life benchmark

UPWP

Unified Planning Work Program [MPO certification document]

USC

United States Code

USDOT

United States Department of Transportation

UZA

urbanized area

WB

westbound

VPI

virtual public involvement

VMT

vehicle-miles traveled

VOCs

volatile organic compounds

VRM

vehicle revenue-miles

VUS

Vulnerable User Safety [federal funding program]

 

 

 

Executive Summary

Introduction

The Boston Region Metropolitan Planning Organization’s (MPO) five-year capital investment plan, the Federal Fiscal Years (FFYs) 2024–28 Transportation Improvement Program (TIP), is the near-term investment program for the region’s transportation system. Guided by the Boston Region MPO’s vision, goals, and objectives, the TIP prioritizes investments that preserve the current transportation system in a state of good repair, provide safe transportation for all modes, enhance livability, promote equity and sustainability, and improve mobility throughout the region. These investments fund arterial roadway and intersection improvements, maintenance and expansion of the public transit system, bicycle path construction, infrastructure improvements for pedestrians, and major highway reconstruction.

 

The Boston Region MPO is guided by a 22-member board with representatives of state agencies, regional organizations, and municipalities. Its jurisdiction extends roughly from Boston north to Ipswich, south to Marshfield, and west to municipalities along Interstate 495. Each year, the MPO conducts a process to decide how to spend federal transportation funds for capital projects. The Central Transportation Planning Staff (CTPS), which is the staff to the MPO, manages the TIP development process.

 

MPO staff coordinates the evaluation of project funding requests, proposes programming of current and new projects based on anticipated funding levels, supports the MPO board in developing a draft TIP document, and facilitates a public review of the draft before the MPO board endorses the final document.

 

FFYs 202428 TIP Investments

The complete TIP program is available in Chapter 3 of this document and online at bostonmpo.org/tip. The TIP tables provide details of how funding is allocated to each programmed project and capital investment program. These tables are organized by federal fiscal year and are grouped by highway and transit programs.

 

Highway Program

The Highway Program of the TIP funds the priority transportation projects advanced by the Massachusetts Department of Transportation (MassDOT) and the cities and towns within the Boston region. The program is devoted primarily to preserving and modernizing the existing roadway network by reconstructing arterial roadways, resurfacing highways, and replacing bridges.

 

In Massachusetts, Federal-Aid Highway Program funding is apportioned by MassDOT, which allocates funding to Grant Anticipation Notes (GANs) payments, various statewide programs, and Regional Targets for the state’s MPOs. In the FFYs 2024–28 TIP, roadway, bridge, and bicycle and pedestrian programs account for nearly $2.4 billion in funding to the Boston region. The Regional Target funding provided to the MPOs may be programmed for projects at the discretion of each MPO, whereas MassDOT has discretion to propose its recommended projects for statewide programs, such as those related to bridge repairs and interstate highway maintenance.

 

Transit Program

The Transit Program of the TIP provides funding for projects and programs that address the capital needs prioritized by the three transit authorities in the region: the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA), the Cape Ann Transportation Authority (CATA), and the MetroWest Regional Transit Authority (MWRTA). The Transit Program is predominantly dedicated to achieving and maintaining a state of good repair for all assets throughout the transit system.

 

The FFYs 2024–28 TIP includes $4.05 billion in transit investments by the transit authorities that will support state of good repair, modernize transit systems, and increase access to transit. Additionally, beginning in FFY 2025, the MPO will allocate $6.5 million of its annual Regional Target funds to its new Transit Modernization investment program. This program aims to build on the investments made through the Transit Program by using a portion of Highway Program funding to fulfill unmet transit project needs in the region. The MPO has already begun to fund discrete projects through this program prior to FFY 2025 based on a surplus of available funding in FFY 2024, as detailed below.

 

Regional Target Program Details

During FFYs 2024–28, the Boston Region MPO plans to fund 58 projects with its Regional Target funding. In total, 21 new projects were added to the MPO’s Regional Target Program during this TIP cycle. Details on these projects are available in Table ES-1.


 

Table ES-1
New Regional Target Projects Funded in the FFYs 2024–28 TIP

Project Name

Municipality (Proponent)

MPO Investment Program

FFYs of Funding

Regional Target Dollars Programmed in FFYs 2024–28 

 

Malden—Spot Pond Brook Greenway

Malden

Bicycle Network and Pedestrian Connections

2027

$4,858,127

 

Natick—Cochituate Rail Trail Extension, from MBTA station to Mechanic Street

Natick

Bicycle Network and Pedestrian Connections

2028

$7,760,451

 

Westwood–Norwood—Reconstruction of Canton Street to University Drive, including rehabilitation of N-25-032=W-31-018

Westwood

Complete Streets

2027

$22,094,875

 

Boston—Bridge Preservation, B-16-066 (38D), Cambridge Street over MBTA

Boston

Complete Streets

2026

$16,632,000

 

Wakefield—Comprehensive Downtown Main Street Reconstruction

Wakefield

Complete Streets

2028

$16,581,200

 

MWRTA CatchConnect Microtransit Service Expansion Phase II

MWRTA

Community Connections

2024–26

$380,477

 

Lynn—Broad Street Corridor Transit Signal Priority

Lynn

Community Connections

2024

$297,800

Medford Bicycle Parking–Tier 1

Medford

Community Connections

2024

$29,600

Medford Bluebikes Expansion

Medford

Community Connections

2024

$118,643

Canton Public Schools Bike Program

Canton

Community Connections

2024

$22,500

Canton Center Bicycle Racks

Canton

Community Connections

2024

$10,000

Boston Electric Bluebikes Adoption

Boston

Community Connections

2024

$1,020,000

Cambridge Electric Bluebikes Adoption

Cambridge

Community Connections

2024

$352,575

Acton Parking Management System

Acton

Community Connections

2024

$15,000

Bikeshare State of Good Repair Set-Aside

CTPS

Community Connections

2025–28

6,000,000

Everett—Targeted Multi-Modal and Safety Improvements on Route 16

MassDOT

Intersection Improvements

2027

$5,246,920

Chelsea—Targeted Safety Improvements and Related Work on Broadway, from Williams Street to City Hall Avenue

MassDOT

Intersection Improvements

2025

$12,872,911

Jackson Square Station Accessibility Improvements

MBTA

Transit Modernization

2024–25

$26,250,000

Rail Transformation Early Action Items—Reading Station and Wilbur Interlocking

MBTA

Transit Modernization

2024

$14,000,000

Columbus Ave Bus Lane Phase II

MBTA

Transit Modernization

2024

$11,750,000

Project Design Support Pilot

CTPS

Project Design Support Pilot

2025

$4,000,000

Total

N/A

N/A

N/A

$150,293,079

 

 

Note: Funding amounts in this table include both federal and non-federal funds, including matching funds.

CTPS = Central Transportation Planning Organization. FFY = federal fiscal year. MPO = metropolitan planning organization. MWRTA = MetroWest Regional Transit Authority. N/A = not applicable. TIP = Transportation Improvement Program.

Source: Boston Region MPO.

 

Signed into law on November 15, 2021, the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law (BIL) is the five-year federal funding authorization for transportation projects and programs, replacing the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation (FAST) Act as the primary governing legislation for the TIP process. The BIL increased the amount of Regional Target funding available to the Boston Region MPO for the development of the FFYs 2024–28 TIP by approximately 20 percent from the funding levels in TIPs under the FAST Act, the last of which was the FFYs 2022–26 TIP.

 

The majority of the funding available for allocation by the MPO during the FFYs 2024–28 TIP cycle was in the fifth and final year of the TIP, FFY 2028. However, changes in project readiness for some projects created funding surpluses in the early years of the TIP, FFYs 2024 and 2025, and in FFY 2027. These surpluses were driven by programming delays for several projects already funded by the MPO. This dynamic led to a funding surplus in excess of $66.5 million in FFYs 2024 and 2025 and total funding availability of $202 million across all years of the TIP.

 

The MPO did not have any currently funded Regional Target projects that could be accelerated to make use of these funds, so the MPO worked with MassDOT and the MBTA to identify projects that could be funded in these fiscal years. Jointly, MassDOT and the MBTA brought more than a dozen projects to the MPO for consideration, from which the MPO selected four projects for funding in FFYs 2024 and 2025:

 

The MPO also selected a MassDOT project for funding in FFY 2027:

 

These projects were not formally evaluated using the MPO’s project selection criteria prior to the MPO making draft funding decisions, as MPO staff did not have sufficient time to score the projects prior to the deadline for MPO decision-making. Despite not being scored, the projects generally align well with many of the MPO’s goals, including enhancing bicycle and pedestrian safety and access, and expanding the accessibility of and maintaining a state of good repair for the region’s transit system and critical roadways. Scoring information will be included for these projects when available.

 

Several other key decisions were made by the MPO in the drafting of the FFYs 2024–28 Regional Target Program, including the following:

 

Figure ES-1 shows how the Regional Target funding for FFYs 2024–28 is distributed across the MPO’s investment programs. As the chart shows, the Boston Region MPO’s Regional Target Program is devoted primarily to enhancing mobility and safety for all travel modes through significant investments in Complete Streets projects. A large portion of the MPO’s funding also supports the modernization of key regional roadways and transit infrastructure through investments in Major Infrastructure and Transit Modernization projects. The MPO also elected to leave approximately $31.9 million unprogrammed, preferring to retain these funds for use in future TIP cycles in support of a more flexible overall program in the coming fiscal years.

 

 

Figure ES-1
FFYs 2024–28 TIP Regional Target Funding by MPO Investment Program

 

A chart showing the allocations of MPO regional target funding by investment program, including unprogrammed fund balance.

FFY = federal fiscal year. MPO = metropolitan planning organization. TIP = Transportation Improvement Program.

Source: Boston Region MPO.

 

In addition to the distribution of funding across the MPO’s investment programs listed above, Table ES-2 further details the number of projects and the allocation of funds across each program in the FFYs 2024–28 TIP. As noted in Figure ES-1, the MPO has programmed more than 95 percent of its available funding over five years. More details about every project funded through the MPO’s Regional Target Program are available in Chapter 3.

 

Table ES-2
FFYs 2024–28 Boston Region MPO Regional Target Investment Summary

MPO Investment Program

Number of Projects

Regional Target Dollars Programmed

Bicycle Network and Pedestrian Connections

6

$66,140,116

Community Connections (allocated to projects)*

17

$11,529,796

Community Connections (not yet allocated to projects)

N/A

$8,334,827

Complete Streets

22

$328,884,130

Intersection Improvements

5

$44,424,588

Major Infrastructure—Roadway

3

$125,094,890

Transit Modernization (allocated to projects)

4

$65,600,000

Transit Modernization (not yet allocated to projects)

N/A

$21,500,000

Unprogrammed

N/A

$26,036,440

Total

57

$697,544,788

 

Note: Funding amounts in this table include both federal and non-federal funds, including matching funds.

* This includes $6 million in Bikeshare Support funding starting in FFY 2025.

**The $4 million Project Design Support Pilot in FFY 2025 is accounted for under this program.

FFY = federal fiscal year. MPO = metropolitan planning organization. N/A = not applicable.

Source: Boston Region MPO.

 

When making decisions about which projects to fund, the MPO considers how the allocation of funds to each investment program compares to the funding goals outlined in the MPO’s current Long-Range Transportation Plan (LRTP), Destination 2040. The funding goals for investment programs set forth in the LRTP reflect the types of projects the MPO seeks to fund to help it achieve its goals and objectives for the region, from enhancing safety for all users to promoting mobility and accessibility across the region. More information on the MPO’s goals and objectives is available in Chapter 1, and a comparison between LRTP investment program goals and program funding levels in the FFYs 2024–28 TIP is shown in Figure ES-2.

 


 

Figure ES-2
FFYs 2024–28 TIP: Regional Target Funding Levels Relative to LRTP Investment Program Goals

 

A chart illustrating how the actual allocations of MPO target funding compare to the goals set forth by the MPO's Long Range Transportation Program, by investment program.

FFY = federal fiscal year. LRTP = Long-Range Transportation Plan. TIP = Transportation Improvement Program.

Source: Boston Region MPO.

 

The investments made in the FFYs 2024–28 TIP will be implemented in 38 cities and towns throughout the Boston region, ranging from dense inner core communities to developing suburbs further from the urban center. Figure ES-3 illustrates the distribution of Regional Target funding among the eight subregions within the Boston Region MPO’s jurisdiction, as defined by the Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC). This figure also shows how the distribution of funds compares to key metrics for measuring the need for funding by subregion, including the percent of regional population, employment, and Federal-Aid roadway miles within each subregion.

 


 

Figure ES-3
FFYs 2024–28 TIP: Regional Target Funding Levels Relative to Key Indicators

A chart that compares the allocation of regional target funding to key indicators, including the percent of funding allocated to projects in each MAPC subregion, the percent of population that subregion represents in the broader Boston region, the percent of employment generated within that subregion, and the percent of federal aid-eligible roadway miles in the subregion.

 

Note: Unprogrammed funds and funds held for the MPO’s Transit Modernization and Community Connections Programs are not included in this figure.

FFY = federal fiscal year. MAGIC = Minuteman Advisory Group on Interlocal Coordination. MAPC = Metropolitan Area Planning Council. MetroWest = MetroWest Regional Collaborative. NSPC = North Suburban Planning Council. NSTF = North Shore Task Force. SSC = South Shore Coalition. SWAP = South West Advisory Committee. TIP = Transportation Improvement Program. TRIC = Three Rivers Interlocal Council.

Source: Boston Region MPO.

 

Additional information on the geographic distribution of Regional Target funding across the region, including a breakdown of funding by municipality, is included in Appendix D.

 

Financing The FFYs 202428 TIP

Highway Program

The TIP Highway Program was developed with the assumption that federal funding for the state would range between $709 million and $865 million annually over the next five years. These amounts include the funds that would be set aside initially by MassDOT as payments for the Accelerated Bridge Program and exclude required matching funds. The funding levels for the FFYs 2024–28 TIP’s Highway Program represent an increase of approximately two percent over those in the FFYs 2023–27 TIP.

 

 

The process of deciding how to use this federal funding in the Boston region follows several steps. First, MassDOT reserves funding for GANs debt service payments for the Accelerated Bridge Program; annual GANs payments range between $89 million and $134 million annually over the first three years of this TIP. GANs payments for the Accelerated Bridge Program are expected to conclude in FFY 2026.

 

The remaining Federal-Aid Highway Program funds are budgeted to support state and regional (i.e., MPO) priorities. In the FFYs 2024–28 TIP, $1.07 billion to $1.15 billion annually was available for programming statewide, including both federal dollars and the local match. MassDOT customarily provides the local match (which can also be provided by other entities); thus, projects are typically funded with 80 percent federal dollars and 20 percent state dollars, depending on the funding program. Costs for project design are borne by the proponent of the project.

 

Next, MassDOT allocates funding across the following funding categories:

 

Finally, once these needs have been satisfied, MassDOT allocates the remaining funding among the state’s 13 MPOs for programming. This discretionary funding for MPOs is suballocated by formula to determine the Regional Target amounts. The Boston Region MPO receives the largest portion of MPO funding in the state, with approximately 43 percent of Massachusetts’ Regional Target funds allocated to the region. MassDOT develops these targets in consultation with the Massachusetts Association of Regional Planning Agencies (MARPA). This TIP was programmed with the assumption that the Boston Region MPO will have between $129 million and $158 million annually for Regional Target amounts, which consist of federal funding and state funding for the local match.

 

Each MPO may decide how to prioritize its Regional Target funding. Given that the Regional Target funding is a subset of the Highway Program, the MPO typically programs the majority of funding for roadway projects; however, the MPO has flexed portions of its highway funding to the Transit Program for transit expansion projects and through its Transit Modernization and Community Connections Programs. The TIP Highway Program details the projects that will receive Regional Target funding from the Boston Region MPO and statewide infrastructure projects within the Boston region. Details on these investments are outlined in Chapter 3.

 

Transit Program

The Federal Transit Administration (FTA) allocates the funds programmed in the TIP Transit Program according to formula. The three regional transit authorities in the Boston Region MPO area that are recipients of these funds are the MBTA, CATA, and MWRTA. The MBTA, with its extensive transit program and infrastructure, is the recipient of the preponderance of the region’s federal transit funds.

 

As the current federal transportation legislation, the BIL allocates funding to transit projects through the following formula programs:

 

The TIP Development Process

Overview

When determining which projects to fund through the Regional Target funding process, MPO members collaborate with municipalities, state agencies, members of the public, advocacy groups, and other stakeholders. The MPO board uses evaluation criteria in its project selection process to help identify and prioritize projects that advance progress on the MPO’s six goal areas:

 

Additionally, the MPO has established investment programs, which are designed to direct Regional Target funding towards MPO priority areas over the next 20 years, to help meet these goals. The investment programs are as follows:

 

Projects that the MPO selects to receive Regional Target funding through the TIP development process are included in one of the six investment programs listed above. More information on the MPO’s investment programs is available in Chapter 2.

 

The MPO incorporates performance-based planning and programming (PBPP) practices into its TIP development and other processes. These practices are designed to help direct MPO funds towards achieving specific outcomes for the transportation system. MPO investments directly relate to the PBPP framework and further the MPO’s goals and performance targets.  With the development of the FFYs 2024-28 TIP, the MPO leveraged funding availability across all fiscal years to program new projects to address transit system reliability, traffic safety for all users, NHS bridge condition, and other priorities. The MPO will continue to closely link its performance targets, investment decisions, and monitoring and evaluation activities. More information on PBPP is available in Chapter 4 and Appendix A (Table A-2).

 

Outreach and Data Collection

The outreach process begins early in the federal fiscal year. Cities and towns designate TIP contacts and begin developing a list of priority projects to be considered for federal funding, and the MPO staff asks the staff of cities and towns in the region to identify their priority projects. MPO staff compiles the project funding requests into a Universe of Projects, which is a list of all Bicycle Network and Pedestrian Connections, Complete Streets, Intersection Improvements, and Major Infrastructure projects identified as potential candidates to receive funding through the TIP.

 

Certain types of projects are not listed in the Universe at this time. Projects that would be candidates for funding from the MPO’s Community Connections Program are not included because all projects that apply for this program’s discrete application process are considered for funding. Also, Transit Modernization projects are not listed because the project intake process for this program is being developed. During the development of the FFYs 2024-28 TIP, the MPO engaged transit stakeholders to provide projects to utilize funding availability in FFYs 2024 and 2025, an exception to the process but a key step towards formalizing an intake strategy for the next FFYs 2025–29 TIP.

 

The Universe includes projects at varying levels of readiness, from those with significant engineering and design work complete to those still early in the conceptual or planning stage. MPO staff collects data on each project in the Universe so that the projects may be evaluated.

 

Project Evaluation

MPO staff evaluates projects based on how well they address the MPO’s goals. For MPO staff to conduct a complete project evaluation, Bicycle Network and Pedestrian Connections, Complete Streets, Intersection Improvements, and Major Infrastructure projects must have a functional design report or the project plans must include the level of detail defined in a functional design report, a threshold typically reached when a project nears the 25 percent design stage. To complete an evaluation for projects under consideration through the MPO’s Community Connections Program, project proponents must submit a completed application to MPO staff.

 

In response to significant cost increases in recent TIP cycles for projects already programmed for funding, the MPO board created a committee in the wake of the FFYs 2022–26 TIP cycle to further explore the causes of project cost increases and devise MPO policy changes to support more reliable project delivery. The TIP Project Cost Ad Hoc Committee began its work in June 2021 and advanced a set of policy recommendations to the full MPO board in September 2021. These changes were formally adopted by the MPO on November 4, 2021, and were in effect for the development of the FFYs 2024–28 TIP.

 

Among other changes, the MPO elected to codify its policy of requiring that project proponents submit 25 percent designs and obtain an updated cost estimate for their projects prior to being programmed in the TIP. While this new policy was formally in effect for the FFYs 2024–28 TIP cycle, the MPO desired to keep this threshold flexible in its first year of implementation, given that the policy was not adopted until after the start of TIP development.

 

The evaluation results for all projects are presented to the MPO board members for their consideration for programming in the TIP. Draft scores are shared directly with project proponents, at which point proponents are encouraged to review the scores and provide feedback so that MPO staff may make any warranted adjustments to arrive at accurate final results. Once proponents review their scores, final scoring results are posted on the MPO’s website where MPO members, municipal officials, and members of the public may review them.

 

TIP Readiness Day

An important step toward TIP programming takes place midway through the TIP development cycle at a meeting—referred to as TIP Readiness Day—that both MassDOT and MPO staff attend. At this meeting, MassDOT project managers provide updates about cost and schedule changes related to currently programmed projects. These cost and schedule changes must be taken into account as MPO staff helps the MPO board consider updates to the already programmed years of the TIP, as well as the addition of new projects in the outermost year of the TIP.

 

Among the other new policies advanced by the TIP Project Cost Ad Hoc Committee, the MPO board adopted a policy requiring proponents of projects that experienced a cost increase of 25 percent or more (for projects costing less than $10 million) or $2.5 million or more (for projects costing more than $10 million) to present to the MPO board on the reasons for these cost increases. The MPO would then compare these projects—at the new costs—to other projects and consider this cost-effectiveness evaluation when deciding whether or not to fund the projects at the higher costs. These cost changes are most often revealed through conversations between MassDOT staff and MPO staff during TIP Readiness Day, making this new policy especially relevant at this stage of TIP development.

 

Staff Recommendation and Draft TIP

Using the evaluation results and information about project readiness (i.e., the extent to which a project is fully designed and ready for construction), MPO staff prepares a recommendation or a series of programming scenarios for how to program the Regional Target funding in the TIP. Other considerations, such as whether a project was included in the LRTP, addresses an identified transportation need, or promotes distribution of transportation investments across the region, are also incorporated into these programming scenarios. The staff recommendation is always financially constrained—meaning, subject to available funding. There was approximately $698 million of Regional Target funding available to the Boston Region MPO for FFYs 2024–28. In this TIP cycle, the MPO board members discussed several scenarios for the Regional Target Program for highway projects and selected a preferred program in March 2023.

 

In addition to prioritizing the Regional Target funding, the MPO board reviews and endorses the statewide highway program that MassDOT recommends for programming. The board also reviews and endorses programming of funds for the MBTA’s, CATA’s, and MWRTA’s transit capital programs.

 

Approving The TIP

After selecting a preferred programming scenario, usually in late March, the MPO board votes to release the draft TIP for a 21-day public review period. The comment period typically begins in late April or early May, and during this time the MPO invites members of the public, municipal officials, and other stakeholders in the Boston region to review the proposed program and submit feedback. During the public review period, MPO staff hosts public meetings to discuss the draft TIP document and elicit additional comments.

 

After the public review period ends, the MPO board reviews all municipal and public comments and may change elements of the document or its programming. The MPO board then endorses the TIP and submits it to the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) for approval. MassDOT incorporates the MPO-endorsed TIP into the State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP). The FHWA, FTA, and United States Environmental Protection Agency review the STIP for certification by September 30, the close of the federal fiscal year.

 

Updates To The TIP

Even after the TIP has been finalized, administrative modifications, amendments, and adjustments often must be introduced because of changes in project schedules, project costs, funding sources, or available revenues. This may necessitate reprogramming a project in a different funding year or programming additional funds for a project.

 

Notices of administrative modifications and amendments are posted on the MPO’s website. If an amendment is necessary, the MPO notifies affected municipalities, stakeholders, and members of the public via email. The MPO typically holds a 21-day public review period before taking final action on an amendment. In extraordinary circumstances, the MPO may vote to shorten the public comment period to a minimum of 15 days. Administrative modifications and adjustments are minor and usually do not warrant a public review period.

 

Stay Involved With The TIP

Public engagement is an important aspect of the transportation planning process. Please visit bostonmpo.org for more information about the MPO, to view the entire TIP, and to submit your comments. You also may wish to sign up for email news updates and notices by visiting bostonmpo.org/subscribe and submitting your contact information. To request a copy of the TIP in accessible formats, please contact the MPO staff by any of the following means:

 

Mail: Boston Region MPO c/o CTPS MPO Activities Group, 10 Park Plaza, Suite 2150, Boston, MA 02116-3968

 

Telephone: 857.702.3700 (voice)

For people with hearing or speaking difficulties, connect through the state MassRelay service:

 

Email: publicinfo@ctps.org

 

The Executive Summary of the FFYs 2024–28 TIP is also available as a translation:

 

 

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Chapter 1: 3C Transportation Planning and the Boston Region Metropolitan Planning Organization

Chapter 1
3C Transportation Planning and the Boston Region Metropolitan Planning Organization

Decisions about how to allocate transportation funds in a metropolitan area are guided by information and ideas gathered from a broad group of people, including elected officials, municipal planners and engineers, transportation advocates, and interested residents. Metropolitan planning organizations (MPO) are the bodies responsible for providing a forum for this decision-making process. Each metropolitan area in the United States with a population of 50,000 or more, also known as an urbanized area, is required by federal legislation to establish an MPO, which decides how to spend federal transportation funds for capital projects and planning studies for the area.

 

THE TRANSPORTATION PLANNING PROCESS

The federal government regulates the funding, planning, and operation of the surface transportation system through the federal transportation program, which was enacted into law through Titles 23 and 49 of the United States Code. Section 134 of Title 23 of the Federal Aid Highway Act, as amended, and Section 5303 of Title 49 of the Federal Transit Act, as amended, require that urbanized areas conduct a transportation planning process, resulting in plans and programs consistent with the planning objectives of the metropolitan area, in order to be eligible for federal funds.

 

The most recent reauthorization of the federal surface transportation law is the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law (BIL), which has succeeded the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation (FAST) Act. The BIL sets policies related to metropolitan transportation planning, and requires that all MPOs carry out a continuing, comprehensive, and cooperative (3C) transportation planning process.

 

3C Transportation Planning

The Boston Region MPO is responsible for carrying out the 3C planning process in the Boston region. The MPO has established the following objectives for the process:

 

 

More information about the federal, state, and regional guidance governing the transportation planning process, and about the regulatory framework in which the MPO operates can be found in Appendix E.

 

THE BOSTON REGION MPO

The Boston Region MPO’s planning area extends across 97 cities and towns from Boston north to Ipswich, south to Marshfield, and west to Interstate 495.

 

Figure 1-1 shows the map of the Boston Region MPO’s member municipalities.

 

Figure 1-1
Municipalities in the Boston Region

 

A map showing the 97 cities and towns that make up the Boston Region, including the eight subregions communities are grouped into.

 

The MPO’s board comprises 22 voting members. Several state agencies, regional organizations, and the City of Boston are permanent voting members, while 12 municipalities are elected as voting members for three-year terms. Eight municipal members represent each of the eight subregions of the Boston region, and there are four at-large municipal seats. The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and Federal Transit Administration (FTA) participate on the MPO board as advisory (nonvoting) members. More details about the MPO’s permanent members can be found in Appendix F.

 

Figure 1-2 shows MPO membership and the organization of the Central Transportation Planning Staff, which serves as staff to the MPO.

 

Figure 1-2
Boston Region MPO Organizational Chart

 

A chart illustrating the organization structure of the Boston Region Metropolitan Planning Organization, in addition to the membership of the MPO's Board

 

MPO Central Vision Statement

The following paragraph is the MPO’s central vision statement, as adopted in Destination 2040, the MPO’s current Long-Range Transportation Plan (LRTP), which was adopted in August 2019.

 

The Boston Region MPO envisions a modern, well-maintained transportation system that supports a sustainable, healthy, livable, and economically vibrant region. To achieve this vision, the transportation system must be safe and resilient; incorporate emerging technologies; and provide equitable access, excellent mobility, and varied transportation options.

 

This vision statement takes into consideration the significant public input received during the drafting of the Needs Assessment for Destination 2040. This statement also reflects the MPO’s desire to emphasize the maintenance and resilience of the transportation system while supporting the MPO’s six core goals: Safety, System Preservation and Modernization, Capacity Management and Mobility, Clean Air and Sustainable Communities, Transportation Equity, and Economic Vitality. More information on the MPO’s vision, goals, and objectives for the transportation system is available in Figure 1-3.

 

The Boston Region MPO is in the process of developing Destination 2050, its next LRTP, which is expected to be completed in the summer of 2023. The updated vision, goals, and objectives created as part of Destination 2050 will not only guide the recommendations included in that plan, but also the development of future MPO Transportation Improvement Programs (TIP) and LRTPs. It was also considered when developing this UPWP. The following paragraph is the MPO’s vision statement as approved in February 2023.

 

The Boston Region Metropolitan Planning Organization envisions an equitable, pollution-free, and modern regional transportation system that gets people to their destinations safely, easily, and reliably, and that supports an inclusive, resilient, healthy, and economically vibrant Boston region.

 

Certification Documents

As part of its 3C process, the Boston Region MPO annually produces the TIP and the Unified Planning Work Program (UPWP). These documents, along with the quadrennial LRTP, are referred to as certification documents and are required for the federal government to certify the MPO’s planning process. This federal certification is a prerequisite for the MPO to receive federal transportation funds. In addition to the requirement to produce the LRTP, TIP, and UPWP, the MPO must establish and conduct an inclusive public participation process, and maintain transportation models and data resources to support air quality conformity determinations and long- and short-range planning work and initiatives.

 

The following is a summary of each of the certification documents.

 

 

Figure 1-3
LRTP Goals and Objectives

 

 

GOALS OBJECTIVES
EQUITY blank
Facilitate an inclusive and transparent transportation-planning process and make investments that eliminate transportation-related disparities borne by people in disadvantaged communities. • Facilitate an inclusive and transparent engagement process with a focus on involving people in disadvantaged communities.*
• Ensure that people have meaningful opportunities to share needs and priorities in a way that influences MPO decisions.
• Eliminate harmful environmental, health, and safety effects of the transportation system on people in disadvantaged communities.
• Invest in high-quality transportation options in disadvantaged communities to fully meet residents’ transportation needs.       * Disadvantaged communities are those in which a significant portion of the population identifies as an MPO equity population—people who identify as minority, have limited English proficiency, are 75 years old or older or 17 years old or younger, or have a disability—or has low income.
SAFETY blank
Achieve zero transportation-related fatalities and serious injuries and improve safety for all users of the transportation system. • Eliminate fatalities, injuries, and safety incidents experienced by people who walk, bike, roll, use assistive mobility devices, travel by car, or take transit.
• Prioritize investments that improve safety for the most vulnerable roadway users: people who walk, bike, roll, or use assistive mobility devices.
• Prioritize investments that eliminate disparities in safety outcomes for people in disadvantaged communities.
MOBILITY AND RELIABILITY blank
Support easy and reliable movement of people and freight. • Enable people and goods to travel reliably on the region’s transit and roadway networks.
• Prioritize investments that address disparities in transit reliability and frequency for people in disadvantaged communities.
• Reduce delay on the region’s roadway network, emphasizing solutions that reduce single-occupancy-vehicle trips, such as travel demand management.
• Prioritize investments that reduce delay on the region’s transit network.
• Support reliable, safe travel by keeping roadways, bridges, transit assets, and other infrastructure in a state of good repair, and prioritize these investments in disadvantaged communities.
• Modernize transit systems and roadway facilities, including by incorporating new technology that supports the MPO’s goals, such as electric-vehicle technologies.
ACCESS AND CONNECTIVITY blank
Provide transportation options and improve access to key destinations to support economic vitality and high quality of life. • Improve multimodal access to jobs, affordable housing, essential services, education, logistics sites, open space, and other key destinations.
• Prioritizing transportation investments that support the region’s and the Commonwealth’s goals for housing production, land use, and economic growth.
• Increase people’s access to transit, biking, walking, and other non-single-occupancy-vehicle transportation options to expand their travel choices and opportunities.  
• Prioritize investments that improve access to high quality, frequent transportation options that enable people in disadvantaged communities to easily get where they want to go.
• Close gaps in walking, biking, and transit networks and support interorganizational coordination for seamless travel.
• Remove barriers to make it easy for people of all abilities to use the transportation system, regardless of whether they walk, bike, roll, use assistive mobility devices, or take transit.
RESILIENCY blank
Provide transportation that supports sustainable environments and enables people to respond and adapt to climate change and other changing conditions. • Prioritize investments to make the region’s roadway and transit infrastructure more resilient and responsive to current and future climate hazards, particularly within areas vulnerable to increased heat and precipitation, extreme storms, winter weather, and sea level rise.
• Prioritize resiliency investments in disadvantaged communities and in areas that bear disproportionate climate and environmental burdens.
• Prioritize investments in transportation resiliency that improve emergency access and protect evacuation routes.
• Prioritize investments that include nature-based strategies such as low-impact design, pavement reduction, and landscape buffers to reduce runoff and negative impacts to water resources, open space, and environmentally sensitive areas.
CLEAN AIR AND HEALTHY COMMUNITIES blank
Provide transportation free of greenhouse gas emissions and air pollutants and that supports good health. • Reduce transportation-related greenhouse gases, other air pollutants, and growth in vehicle-miles traveled by encouraging people and goods to move by non-single-occupancy-vehicle modes.
• Support transit vehicle electrification and use of electric vehicles throughout the transportation system to reduce greenhouse gases and other air pollutants.
• Prioritize investments that address air pollution and environmental burdens experienced by disadvantaged and vulnerable communities.
• Support public health through investments in transit and active transportation options and by improving access to outdoor space and healthcare.

 

 

Figure 1-4 depicts the relationship between the three certification documents and the MPO’s performance-based planning and programming process, which is a means to monitor progress towards the MPO’s goals and to evaluate the MPO’s approach to achieving those goals.

 

 

Figure 1-4
Relationship between the LRTP, TIP, UPWP,
and Performance-Based Planning Process

 

 

 

A diagram illustrating the relationship between the MPO's Transportation Improvement Program, Long Range Transportation Plan, Unified Planning Work Program, and Performance Based Planning Process.

 

 

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Chapter 2: The TIP Process

INTRODUCTION TO THE TIP PROCESS

Transportation improvements are part of the solution to many critical regional, state, national, and even global problems, such as traffic congestion, air pollution, fatalities and injuries on roadways, climate change, and environmental injustice. Therefore, one of the most important decisions a metropolitan planning organization (MPO) faces is deciding how to allocate limited funds for transportation projects and programs. Because there is not nearly enough funding available for all of the necessary and worthy projects that would address these problems, an MPO’s investment choices must be guided by policies that help identify the most viable and effective solutions.

 

The Boston Region MPO is guided by the policies in its Long-Range Transportation Plan (LRTP) and the MPO develops a Transportation Improvement Program (TIP) to prioritize the expenditure of federal funds on transportation projects. The MPO staff manages the development of both plans.

 

During the annual development process for the TIP, the MPO staff supports the MPO board by evaluating project funding requests from municipalities and state transportation agencies. The staff propose a range of alternative scenarios for the programming of new and ongoing projects, based on anticipated yearly funding levels, and work with the board to create a draft TIP document. The staff also facilitates a public involvement process that affords the public an opportunity to comment on proposed projects and review the draft TIP before the MPO board endorses the final document.

 

FUNDING the TIP

Federal Funding Framework

The first step in allocating federal transportation funds is the passage by the United States Congress of a multi-year act that establishes a maximum level of federal transportation funding per federal fiscal year (FFY). The establishment of this level of funding is referred to as an authorization. The most recent authorization act, the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law (BIL), was signed into law on November 15, 2021. The BIL governed the development of the FFYs 2024–28 TIP, including by establishing new formula funding levels, creating new and reauthorizing existing discretionary grant programs, and setting policy priorities. (More information on the impacts of the BIL on the development of the FFYs 2024–28 TIP is available throughout this report, with specific guidance on new BIL Planning Emphasis Areas available in Appendix E.)

 

After the authorization level has been established, the United States Department of Transportation annually allocates funding among the states according to various federal formulas. This allocation is referred to as an apportionment. The annual apportionment rarely represents the actual amount of federal funds that are ultimately committed to a state because of federally imposed limitations on spending in a given fiscal year, referred to as the obligation authority. In Massachusetts, TIPs are developed based on the estimated obligation authority.

 

Federal Highway Program

The TIP Highway Program was developed with the assumption that federal funding for the state would range between $709 million and $865 million annually over the next five years. These amounts include the funds that would be set aside initially by MassDOT as payments for the Accelerated Bridge Program and exclude required matching funds. The funding levels for the FFYs 2024–28 TIP’s Highway Program represent an increase of approximately two percent over those in the FFYs 2023–27 TIP.

 

The process of deciding how to use this federal funding in the Boston region follows several steps. First, MassDOT reserves funding for GANs debt service payments for the Accelerated Bridge Program; annual GANs payments range between $89 million and $134 million annually over the first three years of this TIP. GANs payments for the Accelerated Bridge Program are expected to conclude in FFY 2026.

 

The remaining Federal-Aid Highway Program funds are budgeted to support state and regional (i.e., MPO) priorities. In the FFYs 2024–28 TIP, $1.07 billion to $1.15 billion annually was available for programming statewide, including both federal dollars and the local match. MassDOT customarily provides the local match (which can also be provided by other entities); thus, projects are typically funded with 80 percent federal dollars and 20 percent state dollars, depending on the funding program. Costs for project design are borne by the proponent of the project.

 

Regional Targets

The Regional Targets are discretionary funds for MPOs, sub-allocated by formula to each metropolitan planning region. The Boston Region MPO receives about 43 percent of the total funds available statewide for Regional Targets. MassDOT developed the target formula for determining this distribution of funds in consultation with the Massachusetts Association of Regional Planning Agencies (MARPA).

 

Each MPO in the state can decide how to prioritize its Regional Target funding. Given that the Regional Target funding originates from the Federal-Aid Highway Program, the Boston Region MPO board typically programs the majority of its target funding on roadway projects; however, the MPO board has flexed portions of its TIP Highway Program funding to the TIP’s Transit Program, most notably when the MPO board provided funding in support of the Green Line Extension transit expansion project.

 

Additionally, this FFYs 2024–28 TIP includes an annual allotment of funding to the MPO’s Transit Modernization Program beginning in FFY 2025. This represents the MPO’s first formalized effort to flex Federal-Aid Highway funds to transit projects on a yearly basis, an affirmation of the regional goals to support multimodal transportation options in a meaningful way. More information on the MPO’s investment strategy is discussed later in this chapter.

 

During the next five years, the Boston Region MPO’s total Regional Target funding will be approximately $697 million, an average of $139.4 million per year. As with the overall increase in funding for the Highway Program from the BIL, the MPO’s Regional Target funds increased nearly nine percent per year in the FFYs 2024–28 TIP relative to the levels planned for in the development of the FFYs 2023–27 TIP. The increase in funding was driven by elevated target funding in FFY 2027 and 2028 resulting from the absence of GANs payments. Funding levels in FFYs 2024 through 2026 remain unchanged from the previous TIP. To decide how to spend its Regional Target funding, the MPO engages its 97 cities and towns in an annual TIP development process.

 

Federal Highway Administration Programs

The Federal-Aid Highway Program dollars discussed in this chapter are delivered through several Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) funding programs, each of which has unique requirements. Table 2-1 lists the programs in the BIL that fund projects in the FFYs 2024–28 TIP.


 

Table 2-1
Federal Highway Administration Programs Applicable to the FFYs 2024–28 Transportation Improvement Program

 

BIL Program

Eligible Uses

Bridge Formula Program (BFP)

Efforts to replace, rehabilitate, preserve, protect, and construct highway bridges

Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement

(CMAQ)

A wide range of projects to reduce congestion and improve air quality in nonattainment and maintenance areas for ozone, carbon monoxide, and particulate matter

Highway Safety Improvement Program (HSIP)

Implementation of infrastructure-related highway safety improvements

Metropolitan Planning

Facilities that contribute to an intermodal transportation system, including intercity bus, pedestrian, and bicycle facilities

National Electric Vehicle Infrastructure (NEVI) Program

Projects that support the strategic deployment of electric vehicle (EV) charging infrastructure and establish an interconnected EV network to facilitate data collection, access, and reliability

National Highway Freight Program (NHFP)

Projects that improve the efficient movement of freight on the National Highway Freight Network

National Highway Performance Program (NHPP)

Improvements to interstate routes, major urban and rural arterials, connectors to major intermodal facilities, and the national defense network; replacement or rehabilitation of any public bridge; and resurfacing, restoring, and rehabilitating routes on the Interstate Highway System

Surface Transportation Block Grant Program (STBGP)

A broad range of surface transportation capital needs, including roads; transit, sea, and airport access; and vanpool, bicycle, and pedestrian facilities

Transportation Alternatives Program (TAP)

A set-aside from the STBGP that funds the construction of infrastructure-related projects (for example, sidewalk, crossing, and on-road bicycle facility improvements)

 

Source: Federal Highway Administration.


 

Federal Transit Program

Federal aid for public transit authorities is allocated by formula to urbanized areas (UZAs). MassDOT is the recipient of this federal aid in the Boston MA-NH-RI UZA. In UZAs with populations greater than 200,000, such as the Boston MA-NH-RI UZA, the distribution formula factors in passenger-miles traveled, population density, and other factors associated with each transit provider. The three regional transit authorities (RTAs) in the Boston Region MPO area are the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA), MetroWest Regional Transit Authority (MWRTA), and Cape Ann Transportation Authority (CATA). The MBTA, with its extensive transit program and infrastructure, is the recipient of the preponderance of federal transit funds in the region.

 

The Federal Transit Administration (FTA) distributes funding to transit agencies through several different programs. As previously noted, the MPO also flexes some of its FHWA funding to FTA to support transit investments. Table 2-2 shows FTA programs in the BIL that support transit investments in the FFYs 2024–28 TIP.

 

Table 2-2
Federal Transit Administration Programs Applicable to the FFYs 2024–28 Transportation Improvement Program

 

BIL Program

Eligible Uses

Urbanized Area Formula Grants (Section 5307)

Transit capital and operating assistance in urbanized areas

Fixed Guideway/Bus (Section 5337)

Replacement, rehabilitation, and other state-of-good-repair capital projects

Bus and Bus Facilities (Section 5339)

Capital projects to replace, rehabilitate, and purchase buses and related equipment, and to construct bus-related facilities

Enhanced Mobility of Seniors and Individuals with Disabilities (Section 5310)

Capital expenses that support transportation to meet the special needs of older adults and persons with disabilities

Fixed-Guideway Capital Investment Grants (Section 5309)

Grants for new and expanded rail, bus rapid transit, and ferry systems that reflect local priorities to improve transportation options in key corridors

 

Source: Federal Transit Administration.

 

INVESTMENT FRAMEWORKS

MPO Investment Framework

As mentioned previously, each MPO in the state can decide how to prioritize the Regional Target funding it receives through the processes established by FHWA and MassDOT. The Boston Region MPO’s LRTP defines the investment framework that informs the specific investment decisions made in the TIP by establishing

 

MPO Goals and Objectives

The MPO’s goals and objectives provide the foundation for the evaluation criteria the MPO board uses when selecting transportation projects to be funded with Regional Target dollars. MPO staff compares candidate projects’ characteristics to these criteria to evaluate whether individual projects can help the MPO advance its various goals. The criteria used to select projects for this TIP are based on the MPO’s goals and objectives, adopted as part of Destination 2040, which is the LRTP the MPO endorsed in August 2019. These goals and objectives are listed in Chapter 1.

 

MPO Investment Programs

In Destination 2040 and the prior LRTP, Charting Progress to 2040, the MPO strengthened the link between its spending and improvements to transportation performance by revising its investment programs to include a broader range of prospective projects. These investment programs focus on specific types of projects that the MPO expects will help achieve its goals and objectives for the transportation system. The MPO created these programs to give municipalities the confidence that if they design these types of projects the MPO will be willing to fund them through the TIP:

 

Figure 2-1 provides details about the Destination 2040 investment programs and their relationship to the MPO’s goals. When developing the FFYs 2023–27 TIP, the MPO allocated its Regional Target dollars to these investment programs by assigning them to projects that meet the investment programs’ criteria.

Figure 2-1
Destination 2040 Investment Programs

 

Intersection Improvements (S, SP, CM, CA, TE, EV)

Funds projects to modernize intersection geometry and signalization to improve safety and mobility.
Improvements may include:

Complete Streets (S, SP, CM, CA, TE, EV)

Funds projects that modernize roadways to improve safety and mobility for all users.
Improvements may include:

Transit Modernization Program (S, SP, CM, CA, TE, EV)

Funds projects that modernize transit infrastructure and promote the enhanced ridership, accessibility or resiliency of transit services.
Improvements may include:

Community Connections Program (CM, CA, TE, EV)

Funds a variety of project types, including first- and last-mile solutions and other small, nontraditional transportation projects to enhance mobility and improve air quality.
Improvements may include:

Major Infrastructure Program (S, SP, CM, CA, TE, EV)

Funds projects that enhance major arterials for all users and modernize or expand transit systems to increase capacity. Projects in this program cost more than $50 million; are on major roadways including Interstate Highways, Principal Arterial Freeways and Expressways, or all sections of roadways classified as Principal Arterial “Other” that have fully or partially controlled access; or add new connections to or extend the rail or fixed guideway transit network or the bus rapid transit network. Improvements may include

Bicycle Network and Pedestrian Connections (S, SP, CM, CA, TE, EV)

Funds projects to expand bicycle and pedestrian networks to improve safe access to transit, schools, employment centers, and shopping destinations.
Improvements may include:

KEY: MPO GOALS

S: Safety

SP: System Preservation and Modernization

CM: Capacity Management

CA: Clean Air/Sustainable Communities

TE: Transportation Equity

EV: Economic Vitality

 

The MPO has taken a clear stance that investing in transit is central to improving the region’s broader transportation system. Created in Destination 2040, the Transit Modernization Program represents a significant shift in the MPO’s investment strategy, as funding will be allocated to transit projects on an annual basis beginning in FFY 2025. In prior years, the MPO only funded transit projects on a one-off basis when funding was requested for specific projects in the region.

 

By creating the programming infrastructure to flex Regional Target highway funds to transit projects annually, the Boston Region MPO has established itself as a leader among MPOs nationally by crafting an investment strategy that is truly multimodal. During the development of Destination 2050, the next LRTP to be released in 2023, staff proposed a broadening of the Transit Modernization Program into a Transit Transformation Program starting in FFY 2029, in response to feedback from stakeholders at the MBTA and RTAs.2-1   

 

The MPO funded multiple Transit Modernization projects in FFY 2024 and FFY 2025 to make use of funding surpluses. The MPO has also continued to reserve funding in the amount of $6.5 million in each fiscal year beginning in FFY 2025 for future allocation. The MPO will continue to work with municipalities and transit providers in the region to identify transit needs and determine the most effective use of this funding as this program commences with the FFYs 2025–2029 TIP. As with the Transit Modernization program, the MPO will continue to work with municipalities to develop and fund projects through the Complete Streets investment program. In Destination 2040, the MPO added dedicated bus lanes and climate resiliency measures to the types of projects supported by this program.

 

The MPO decided to increase the funding allocated to the Community Connections Program from $2 million to $2.5 million annually beginning in FFY 2023, as the MPO’s overall Regional Target funding increased with the passage of the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law in November 2021. In this FFYs 2024–28 TIP, the MPO built on the success of the first three rounds of the Community Connections Program, funding nine additional projects on top of the 25 projects funded in the previous three TIP cycles. A tenth line item for a Bikeshare Support Set-Aside was also added, which set aside $1 million in funding for Bikeshare in FFYs 2025 and 2026 and $2 million in FFYs 2026 and 2027. Funding for the Community Connections Program continues to be reserved in FFYs 2025–28 for allocation in future TIP cycles.

 

More information on the projects selected for funding in each of the MPO’s investment programs can be found in Chapter 3.

 

Other Funding Guidelines

When creating investment program guidelines for Destination 2040, the MPO elected to decrease the amount of funding allocated to large-scale projects that would be included in its Major Infrastructure Program in order to focus a larger percentage of funding on lower cost, operations-and-maintenance projects. Such a funding mix will help the MPO address its goals and provide more opportunities for the MPO to distribute federal transportation dollars to projects throughout the region, as opposed to concentrating it on a few large-scale projects.

 

Early in the development of the FFYs 2022–26 TIP, the MPO reassessed its definition of Major Infrastructure projects, adopting a new definition through sequential votes on August 20, 2020, and October 1, 2020. This revised definition carried through to the development of the FFYs 2023–27 TIP and persists in the FFYs 2024-28 TIP. The MPO previously defined Major Infrastructure projects as those that cost more than $20 million or that add capacity to the transportation network. The MPO’s revised definition classifies Major Infrastructure projects as follows:

 

Under the MPO’s prior Major Infrastructure definition, the relatively low-cost threshold caused several large-scale Complete Streets projects to be classified as Major Infrastructure projects although they were local in nature. The changes outlined above are intended to focus the Major Infrastructure investment program on those projects that are of significant scale or that are truly important for the broader region. This allows the MPO to better compare projects when conducting project evaluations. Because the MPO considers the five-year distribution of TIP funds across its investment programs relative to the goals set forth in the LRTP (as shown in Figure 2-2), properly categorizing projects is a critical component of the MPO’s decision-making process. Funding allocation goals like these are some of the LRTP-based guidelines the MPO employs to ensure limited Regional Target funding is programmed in ways that best achieve the MPO’s goals for transportation in the region. As the MPO continues the development of its next LRTP, Destination 2050, it will assess the efficacy of each of its six investment programs to ensure these programs are structured to best support progress on the MPO’s goals and objectives for the region.

 


 

Figure 2-2
Destination 2040 Funding Goals by MPO Investment Program

A chart showing the funding goals by investment program set forth through the current LRTP, Destination 2040.  This includes 45% of funding for complete streets, 30% to major infrastructure, 13% for intersection improvements, 5% for bicycle and pedestrian connections, 5% for transit modernization, and 2% for Community Connections.

Source: Boston Region MPO.

 

The MPO requires that project proponents submit 25 percent designs and obtain an updated cost estimate for their project prior to being programmed in the TIP. This standard was set by the MPO as part of a multi-pronged effort to reduce the prevalence of cost increases for projects that have already been selected for funding in the TIP.

 

MassDOT and Transit Agency Investment Frameworks

MassDOT and the MBTA each update their rolling five-year Capital Investment Plans (CIP) on an annual basis. MassDOT’s CIP identifies priority roadway,  bridge, and statewide infrastructure projects for the five MassDOT divisions and includes funding for specific transit projects such as the South Coast Rail. The MBTA’s CIP outlines the agency’s five-year investment strategy for transit projects in its service area. Both CIP processes use a similar framework that prioritizes funding according to statewide strategic goals for the transportation system. Reliability is the top priority for MassDOT and the MBTA, followed by modernization and then expansion. Both agencies have created investment programs for their respective CIPs that relate to these strategic goals and allocate funding to these programs in ways that emphasize their priority. These goals and investment programs are as follows:

 

 

 

 

DEVELOPING THE TIP

Project Selection Process

Overview

The MPO applies its investment framework when developing the TIP. The MPO board’s process for selecting projects to receive Regional Target funding relies on evaluation criteria to help identify and prioritize projects that advance the MPO’s goals. The criteria are based on the MPO’s goals and objectives outlined in the LRTP. All projects are required to show consistency with the LRTP and other statewide and regional plans. Other considerations include the readiness of a project for construction and municipal support for the project. Background information about the TIP project evaluation process is presented in Appendix A.

 

In the wake of the adoption of Destination 2040 in August 2019, the MPO began the process of revising the TIP evaluation criteria to enhance alignment with the MPO’s updated goals, objectives, and investment programs. These new criteria were adopted by the MPO on October 1, 2020, and were employed during the project selection process for the FFYs 2022–26 , 2023–27, and 2024-28 TIPs. The final criteria were the result of a 15-month process that engaged nearly 1,100 members of the public through surveys and focus groups. This process also prioritized the inclusion of significant direct input from MPO members, which was gathered from more than a dozen presentations, discussions, and focus groups. The outcomes of this process are discussed further in the Project Evaluation section on the following pages.

 

Because of the limitations on in-person gatherings caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, a vast majority of the surveys, focus groups, and presentations discussed above were conducted virtually, with participation options both online and over the telephone. These virtual engagement opportunities allowed MPO staff to pursue new ways of building relationships with members of the public and other key stakeholders in the region. Given the increase in access to the TIP criteria revision process afforded by these virtual events, MPO staff intend to develop a hybrid outreach model that would support both in-person and virtual engagement.

 

In addition to the process outlined above, which focused on developing new criteria for five of the MPO’s investment programs (Bicycle Network and Pedestrian Connections, Complete Streets, Intersection Improvements, Major Infrastructure, and Transit Modernization), the MPO also adjusted the project selection criteria used to evaluate and fund projects through the Community Connections Program in the FFYs 2022–26 and 2023–27 TIPs. These revisions were made based on the lessons learned by MPO staff through the pilot round of this program, which took place during the FFYs 2021–25 TIP cycle.  MPO staff made no further revisions in the development of the FFYs 2024-28 TIP. More information on these criteria is available in the Project Evaluation section of this chapter, as well as in Appendix A.

 

Outreach and Data Collection (October–November)

The TIP development process begins early in the federal fiscal year when cities and towns in the region designate staff as TIP contacts and begin developing a list of priority projects to be considered for federal funding. Each fall, the MPO staff asks these TIP contacts to identify their city or town’s priority projects and then MPO staff elicits input from interested parties and members of the general public.

 

These discussions on municipalities’ priority projects mark the start of a robust dialogue between MPO staff and project proponents that continues through the duration of the TIP cycle. As noted above, these conversations have been taking place virtually because of the COVID-19 pandemic. In November of 2022, MPO staff held two virtual workshops for municipalities in the region to develop an understanding of the TIP process. MPO staff provided additional one-on-one virtual office hours throughout the fall for proponents to ask more detailed questions about advancing specific projects for funding, with several office hour sessions booked for this purpose during the early stages of developing the FFYs 2024–28 TIP.

 

Once project proponents have decided to pursue federal funding, they must begin the formal project initiation process. All new Bicycle Network and Pedestrian Connections, Complete Streets, Intersection Improvements, and Major Infrastructure projects must be initiated with the MassDOT Highway Division before they can be considered for programming in the TIP. MassDOT details this process on its project initiation webpage, mass.gov/info-details/massdot-highway-initiating-a-project. To be considered for programming, proponents of Community Connections projects must submit an application for funding directly to MPO staff, as these projects do not need to be initiated by MassDOT.

  

The MPO staff compiles project funding requests for projects into a Universe of Projects list, which consists of all identified projects being advanced for possible funding in the Bicycle Network and Pedestrian Connections, Complete Streets, Intersection Improvements, and Major Infrastructure investment programs. The Universe includes projects that are at advanced stages of project design, those that are undergoing preliminary engineering and design, and projects still in the conceptual planning stage. Those projects that are active municipal priorities and that are feasibly ready to be programmed in the current TIP cycle continue forward into the MPO’s project evaluation process. Projects that are not ready for programming remain in the Universe for consideration in future TIP cycles. A project Universe is not developed for Community Connections projects, as all eligible projects within this program will be considered for funding during the TIP cycle in which project proponents apply.

 

Project Evaluation (December-February)

The MPO staff uses its project evaluation criteria to logically and transparently evaluate and select projects for programming in the TIP that advance the MPO’s vision for transportation in the region. This process favors projects that support the following goals:

 

As noted previously, the MPO undertook a process of revising the TIP evaluation criteria prior to the launch of the FFYs 2022–26 TIP to enhance the alignment between the TIP project selection process and the MPO’s updated goals, objectives, and investment programs outlined in Destination 2040. In terms of the overall structure of the criteria, this process resulted in the following outcomes:

 

In addition to these broader structural changes, a number of updates were made to individual criteria to better accomplish the MPO’s goals in the LRTP:

 

Several other changes were made to the project evaluation criteria, which are detailed in Appendix A. The point distributions by MPO investment program and LRTP goal area are also available in Figure 2-4. Projects scored using both sets of criteria are programmed in each of these four investment programs in the FFYs 2024–28 TIP, so both sets of criteria are referenced throughout this document.

 

Though many of the adjustments listed above were in development prior to the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, the emerging lessons from this event reinforced the importance of emphasizing criteria that award points to projects that invest in walking, bicycling, and transit infrastructure. Also, the need for new criteria that more directly address existing disparities in health and transportation access for minorities and low-income households has been put into stark relief throughout the pandemic. While the MPO did not elect to rescore any currently programmed projects with these new criteria, the revised criteria will be employed in coming TIP cycles to support the funding of transportation projects that address the issues highlighted by the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

Prior to the FFYs 2022–26 TIP cycle, the MPO also undertook a parallel process to update its evaluation criteria for the smaller-scale, first- and last-mile projects considered for funding through the Community Connections Program. These adjustments were based on the lessons learned from the pilot round of this program during the FFYs 2021–25 TIP cycle. In these revisions, MPO staff created a more focused set of criteria that better aligned with the types of projects pursuing funding through this program. Revisions to the Community Connections criteria addressed the discrepancies between capital and operating projects, as the pilot criteria more heavily favored operating projects. These adjustments resulted in more balanced scores that better reflected the goals of the program when implemented for the FFYs 2022–26 TIP cycle. More information on the scoring areas for these criteria is available in Figure 2-3, and all criteria are available in Appendix A. Projects scored using both sets of criteria are programmed in the Community Connections Program in the FFYs 2024–28 TIP, so both sets of criteria are referenced throughout this document.

 


 

Figure 2-3
TIP Project Evaluation Criteria: Point Distribution for Community Connections Projects

 

A chart showing how points are distributed for Community Connections projects across the six criteria objectives of Connectivity, Coordination, Plan Implementation, Transportation Equity, Mode Shift and Demand Projections, and Fiscal Sustainability.

 

Source: Boston Region MPO

 


Figure 2-4
TIP Project Evaluation Criteria: Point Distributions by Project Type
(All Other Investment Programs)

 

A chart showing how points are distributed for investment programs besides Community Connections across  the six criteria objectives of Connectivity, Coordination, Plan Implementation, Transportation Equity, Mode Shift and Demand Projections, and Fiscal Sustainability.

 

Source: Boston Region MPO.

 

 

In order for the MPO staff to conduct a complete project evaluation, each project proponent must provide enough information so that staff can meaningfully apply the evaluation criteria. Bicycle Network and Pedestrian Connections, Complete Streets, Intersection Improvements, and Major Infrastructure projects must have submitted 25 percent design plans to MassDOT, or its plans must include the level of detail defined in a functional design report. (See MassDOT’s Project Development and Design Guide for information about the contents of a functional design report. This guide is available at mass.gov/lists/design-guides-and-manuals.) For Community Connections projects, proponents must submit a complete application to the MPO, including required supporting documentation such as budget sheets, letters of support from partner entities, and work estimates.  

 

After MPO staff have completed an initial round of project scoring, draft scores are distributed to project proponents for their review. The MPO’s goal is to fairly and accurately assess all projects, making this review a critical component of the TIP process. Proponents are encouraged to submit feedback to MPO staff on their scores if they feel any criteria have been applied inaccurately. Proponents are also encouraged to submit additional supporting documentation on their projects if doing so would help clarify or correct any elements of the draft scoring. MPO staff take all proponent feedback into consideration and make any warranted adjustments to project scores before considering the evaluation process final and preparing the scores for presentation to the MPO.

 

For more details about the criteria used to score projects and project evaluation results for projects considered for programming in this TIP, see Appendix A.

 

TIP Readiness Day (February)

On TIP Readiness Day, MPO staff meets with members of the MassDOT Highway Division and Office of Transportation Planning to review cost and schedule changes related to currently programmed projects, which are undergoing design review, permitting, and right-of-way acquisition. The MPO board then considers these updated project construction costs and changes to the expected dates for construction advertisement when making decisions about changes to TIP programming. These changes have an impact on the ability of the MPO to program its target funds for new projects in the five-year TIP.

 

Between the development of the FFYs 2021–25 TIP and the FFYs 2022–26 TIP, more than half of the projects programmed by the MPO experienced cost increases, many of which represented significant increases in percentage terms or in absolute cost. These changes placed severe limitations on the MPO’s ability to consider new projects for funding during the FFYs 2022–26 TIP cycle. As a partner to MassDOT’s Highway Division and Office of Transportation Planning, the MPO recognizes its role in supporting the on-time and on-budget delivery of projects by proponents. For this reason, the MPO board created a committee in the wake of the FFYs 2022–26 TIP cycle to further explore the causes of project cost increases and devise MPO policy changes to support more reliable project delivery by all parties.

 

The TIP Project Cost Ad Hoc Committee began its work in June 2021 and advanced a set of policy recommendations to the full MPO board in September 2021. These changes were formally adopted by the MPO on November 4, 2021, and went into effect for the development of the FFYs 2023–27 TIP. In addition to the requirement that project proponents submit 25 percent design plans and obtain an updated cost estimate for their project prior to obtaining funding in the TIP, the committee’s work resulted in several other policy changes. Most notably, the MPO board adopted a policy that proponents of any projects that experienced a cost increase of 25 percent or greater (for projects less than $10 million in cost) or of greater than $2.5 million (for projects more than $10 million in cost) would be required to present to the MPO board on the reasons for these cost increases. The MPO would then compare this project—at its new cost—to other projects based on a cost-effectiveness evaluation before making a decision on whether or not to fund the project at its higher cost. These cost changes are most often revealed through conversations between MassDOT staff and MPO staff during TIP Readiness Day, making this policy especially relevant at this stage of TIP development.

 

More information on the work of the TIP Project Cost Ad Hoc Committee is available in Chapter 3.

 

Staff Recommendation and Project Selection (March-April)

Using the evaluation scores and information gathered about project readiness (when a project likely would be fully designed and ready for advertisement) and cost, staff prepares possible TIP project programming scenarios for the MPO’s consideration. When developing these scenarios, MPO staff also considers whether a project was programmed in the LRTP, LRTP-based guidelines for allocating funds to different programs or project types, the distribution of investments across the region, and availability of sufficient funding. The MPO staff gather feedback from board members, project proponents, and the public to inform a final staff recommendation, which is then presented to the MPO for approval before it is included in the draft TIP for public review.

 

Given the significant increase in Regional Target funding in the FFYs 2024-28 TIP resulting from the passage of the BIL, the MPO selected 21 projects for funding during this TIP cycle, including the following:

 

In total, the MPO allocated more than $150 million in this TIP cycle to projects not previously funded in the Regional Target program. More information on the projects funded in the FFYs 2024–28 TIP is available in Chapter 3.

 

Selection Process for Projects Prioritized by the State and Transit Agencies

As discussed above, the selection of transit, bridge, and statewide infrastructure projects for programming in the TIP draws primarily from the CIPs produced by MassDOT and the MBTA. These agencies evaluate projects for inclusion in CIP programs using criteria established by the independent Project Selection Advisory Council (PSAC). The following criteria from the PSAC process guide project evaluation:

 

Projects that receive the highest priority are those that meet each agency’s goals for maintaining and improving the overall condition and reliability of the system; modernizing the system to make it safer and more accessible and to accommodate growth; and expanding and diversifying transportation options for communities. These project-prioritization processes may also reflect other planning initiatives, such as Focus40, the MBTA’s 25-year investment plan, or MassDOT’s modal plans. More information on regulatory and planning guidance governing TIP project prioritization is available in Appendix E. Once project prioritization is complete, programming decisions are made based on these evaluations and information regarding project readiness, program sizing, and existing asset management plans.

 

As discussed previously, the transit element of the TIP also includes the Federal-Aid Programs of the other two RTAs in the region, CATA and MWRTA. Once selection processes are complete for all four agencies, these agencies submit their lists of bridge and roadway projects, bicycle and pedestrian improvements, statewide infrastructure items, and transit capital projects to the MPO for review.

 

APPROVING THE TIP

Approval of the Draft TIP for Public Review

The MPO board considers the project evaluation results and staff recommendation when prioritizing projects for Regional Target funding. The board also considers public comments, the regional importance of projects, and other factors. In addition to prioritizing the Regional Target funding, the MPO board reviews MassDOT’s proposed statewide highway programming and the proposed capital programs for the MBTA, CATA, and MWRTA before voting to release a draft TIP for public review.

 

The MPO board votes to release the draft document for public review and invites members of the public, municipal and elected officials, and other stakeholders in the Boston region to review the proposed TIP. The MPO staff hosts outreach events during the public review period to elicit comments on the draft document. (See Appendix C for a full list of public comments submitted on the draft TIP.)

 

Approval of the Draft TIP

After the public review period ends, the MPO staff and board review all public comments, and the board may change the programming or the document as appropriate before endorsing the TIP. MassDOT staff incorporates the MPO-endorsed TIP into the State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) and submits it to the FHWA and FTA for approval. The FHWA, FTA, and US Environmental Protection Agency review the STIP and certify it by September 30, the end of the federal fiscal year.

 

UPDATING THE TIP

The TIP is a dynamic program that may be amended and adjusted throughout the year. Administrative modifications and amendments are often introduced because of changes in project status (advertisement readiness), project cost, project design scope, or available revenue. An amendment is a revision that requires public review and a demonstration of fiscal constraint.

 

Consistent with federal guidelines, the Boston Region MPO must release an amendment if there is (1) a change in project cost of $500,000 or more for projects valued at $5 million or less, or (2) a change of 10 percent or more of the project cost for projects valued greater than $5 million. TIP amendments are also released if there is a proposal to add or remove a project from the TIP or if the programming year of a project is changed. Cost changes that are less than the above threshold amounts may be considered in the form of administrative modifications or adjustments, which must still undergo MPO board action for approval. Administrative modifications or adjustments are also undertaken in the event that a project’s funding source changes. Although a public review period is not required for administrative modifications or adjustments, one may be offered at the MPO board’s discretion.

 

Regardless of the nature of an amendment, all proposed TIP amendments are presented in a public setting at an MPO meeting, and details are posted on the MPO’s website, bostonmpo.org. Public notices are distributed through the MPO’s email contact list, which members of the public may join by signing up on the MPO’s website. Municipal staff who are TIP contacts at the affected municipalities and the public are notified of pending amendments at the start of an amendment’s public review period.

 

A history of TIP Amendments can be found at https://www.ctps.org/tip.

 

Public Notice

Notices of draft TIP amendments include a summary of the amendment’s contents, dates of the public review period, contact information for submitting a comment to the MPO, and the date, time, and location that the MPO will vote on that amendment. Municipal representatives and members of the public are invited to submit written or oral testimony at the MPO meetings at which amendments are discussed or voted upon.

 

The MPO typically holds a 21-day public review period before taking final action on an amendment. In extraordinary circumstances, the MPO may vote to shorten the public review period to a minimum of 15 days. These circumstances are detailed in the MPO’s Public Engagement Plan.

 

The MPO’s website is the best place to find current information about the TIP. All changes to the draft TIP and changes to the endorsed TIP, such as amendments and modifications that have been approved by the MPO, are available on the TIP webpage, bostonmpo.org/tip.

 

Comments or questions about the draft TIP materials may be submitted directly to the MPO staff via the website, email, or US mail, or voiced at MPO meetings and other public MPO events.

 

 

2-1 The Community Connections Program was formerly referred to as the Community Transportation/Parking/Clean Air and Mobility Program when it was originally created in the MPO’s 2015 LRTP, Charting Progress to 2040.

 

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Chapter 3: Summary of Highway and Transit Programming

Chapter 3—Highway and Transit Programming

The Transportation Improvement Program (TIP) tables included in this chapter present a listing of all the projects and programs funded with federal highway and transit aid in the Boston region during federal fiscal years (FFYs) 2024–28. These funding tables are also included as part of the State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP).

 

Table 3-1 presents a summary of the Boston Region Metropolitan Planning Organization’s (MPO) share of Regional Target funds from the Federal-Aid Highway Program. The allocation of these funds is constrained by projections of available federal aid. As shown in Table 3-1, the MPO has programmed much of the available discretionary funds within the limits of projected funding for highway funding programs. As such, the FFYs 2024–28 TIP Regional Target Program complies with financial constraint requirements.

 

Table 3-1
Boston Region MPO Regional Target Program
Funding Summary

 

FFY 2024

FFY 2025

FFY 2026

FFY 2027

FFY 2028

Total

Regional Target Obligation Authority

$130,647,095

128,427,689

$125,285,687

$155,132,142

$158,052,175

$697,544,788

Regional Target Funds Programmed

$126,991,048

$125,975,489

$124,667,241

$144,006,044

$149,868,526

$671,508,348

Regional Target Funds Unprogrammed

$3,656,047

$2,452,200

$618,446

$11,126,098

$8,183,649

$26,036,440

Source: Boston Region MPO.

 

 

As discussed in Chapter 2, the signing of the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law (BIL), on November 15, 2021, increased the amount of Regional Target funding available to the Boston Region MPO for the development of the FFYs 2024–28 TIP by approximately nine percent from the funding levels in the FFYs 2023–27 TIP. The projects selected by the MPO for funding for the first time in the FFYs 2024–28 TIP are listed in Table 3-2.

 

During the development of the FFYs 2024–28 TIP, the MPO had significant amounts of funding available to program for each fiscal year. This surplus was driven by programming delays for nine projects.

 

Projects already programmed in the TIP to receive Regional Target funds could not be accelerated, so the MPO worked with the Massachusetts Department of Transportation (MassDOT) and the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA) to identify other projects that could be funded in these fiscal years. Jointly, MassDOT and the MBTA presented more than a dozen projects to the MPO for consideration, from which the MPO selected five projects for funding in FFYs 2024 and 2025:

 

The MPO also selected one MassDOT project for funding in FFY 2027:

 

The MPO staff has not yet evaluated these projects using the MPO’s project selection criteria because of time constraints associated with the MPO board’s deadlines for making decisions about project funding. However, these projects generally align well with many of the MPO’s goals, including enhancing bicycle and pedestrian safety and access, and expanding the accessibility of and maintaining a state of good repair for the region’s transit system and critical roadways. Scoring information for these projects will be included in the TIP when it is available.

 

 

Table 3-2
New Regional Target Projects Funded in the FFYs 2024–28 TIP

Project Name

Municipality (Proponent)

MPO Investment Program

FFYs of Funding

Regional Target Dollars Programmed in FFYs 2024–28 

Malden—Spot Pond Brook Greenway

Malden

Bicycle Network and Pedestrian Connections

2027

$4,858,127

Natick—Cochituate Rail Trail Extension, from MBTA Station to Mechanic Street

Natick

Bicycle Network and Pedestrian Connections

2028

$7,760,451

Westwood–Norwood—Reconstruction of Canton Street to University Drive, including Rehabilitation of N-25-032=W-31-018

Westwood

Complete Streets

2028

$22,094,875

Boston—Bridge Preservation, B-16-066 (38D), Cambridge Street over MBTA

Boston

Complete Streets

2026

$16,632,000

Wakefield—Comprehensive Downtown Main Street Reconstruction

Wakefield

Complete Streets

2028

$16,581,200

MWRTA CatchConnect Microtransit Service Expansion Phase 2

MWRTA

Community Connections

2024–26

$380,477

Lynn—Broad Street Corridor Transit Signal Priority

Lynn

Community Connections

2024

$297,800

 

Medford Bicycle Parking–Tier 1

Medford

Community Connections

2024

$29,600

 

Medford Bluebikes Expansion

Medford

Community Connections

2024

$118,643

 

Canton Public Schools Bike Program

Canton

Community Connections

2024

$22,500

 

Canton Center Bicycle Racks

Canton

Community Connections

2024

$10,000

 

Boston Electric Bluebikes Adoption

Boston

Community Connections

2024

$1,020,000

 

Cambridge Electric Bluebikes Adoption

Cambridge

Community Connections

2024

$352,575

 

Acton Parking Management System

Acton

Community Connections

2024

$15,000

 

Everett—Targeted Multi-Modal and Safety Improvements on Route 16

MassDOT

Intersection Improvements

2027

$5,246,920

 

Chelsea—Targeted Safety Improvements and Related Work on Broadway, from Williams Street to City Hall Avenue

MassDOT

Intersection Improvements

2025

$6,315,013

 

Jackson Square Station Accessibility Improvements

MBTA

Transit Modernization

2024–25

$26,250,000

 

Rail Transformation Early Action Items—Reading Station and Wilbur Interlocking

MBTA

Transit Modernization

2024

$14,000,000

 

Columbus Avenue Bus Lanes Phase 2

MBTA

Transit Modernization

2024

$11,750,000

 

Bikeshare State of Good Repair Set-Aside

CTPS

Community Connections

2025–28

$6,000,000

 

Project Design Support Pilot

CTPS

Project Design Support Pilot

2025

$4,000,000

 

Total

N/A

N/A

N/A

$150,293,079

 

 

Note: Funding amounts in this table include both federal and non-federal funds, including matching funds.

*Funding in this table represents the first year of funding, with additional funding anticipated to be allocated to these projects by the Boston Region MPO in future fiscal years.
CTPS = Central Transportation Planning Staff. FFY = federal fiscal year. MassDOT = Massachusetts Department of Transportation. MBTA = Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority. MWRTA = MetroWest Regional Transit Authority. N/A = not applicable. TIP = Transportation Improvement Program.

Source: Boston Region MPO.

 

In addition to the project selection, several other key decisions were made by the MPO in the drafting of the FFYs 2024–28 Regional Target Program:

 

Additional details of the specific projects programmed with Regional Target funding are shown in Section 1A of each annual element of the TIP tables (Table 3-7). The other sections in Table 3-7 (Sections 1B, 2A, 2B, 2C, and 3B) list the following:

 

Tables 3-8, 3-9, 3-10, and 3-11 list the federally funded transit projects and programs in the Boston region that the MBTA, MetroWest Regional Transit Authority (MWRTA), and Cape Ann Transportation Authority (CATA) plan to undertake.

 

Detailed descriptions of projects funded through both the Regional Target and statewide portions of the Highway Program follow the tables. The descriptions note the evaluation scores (for MPO-funded projects), project proponents, and funding details. The pages are organized alphabetically by the municipality in which each project is located.

 

Investment Summary

This section summarizes the investments made by the Boston Region MPO, MassDOT, MBTA, CATA, and MWRTA that are documented in the FFYs 2024–28 TIP. Table 3-3 shows the Boston Region MPO’s investments of Regional Target funding—including both the number of projects and the dollar amount—by investment program. These investments are aimed at making progress towards the MPO’s goals for the region, including enhancing safety for all users, preserving and modernizing the transportation system, promoting mobility and reducing congestion, supporting clean air and sustainability, ensuring all have equitable access to the transportation system, and fostering economic vitality in the region through investments in transportation.

 

The MPO’s Regional Target Program increased in size by approximately $52 million between the FFYs 2023–27 TIP and the FFYs 2024–28 TIP to a total program size of more than $697 million.

 

 

Table 3-3
FFYs 2024–28 Boston Region MPO Regional Target Investment Summary

MPO Investment Program

Number of Projects

Regional Target Dollars Programmed

Bicycle Network and Pedestrian Connections

6

$66,140,116

Community Connections (allocated to projects)*

17

$11,529,796

Community Connections (not yet allocated to projects)

N/A

$8,334,827

Complete Streets**

22

$328,884,131

Intersection Improvements

5

$44,424,588

Major Infrastructure—Roadway

3

$125,094,890

Transit Modernization (allocated to projects)

4

$65,600,000

Transit Modernization (not yet allocated to projects)

N/A

$21,500,000

Unprogrammed

N/A

$26,036,440

Total

57

$697,544,788

Note: Funding amounts in this table include both federal and non-federal funds, including matching funds.

* This figure includes $6 million in BikeShare Support funding starting in FFY 2025.

**The $4 million Project Design Support Pilot in FFY 2025 is accounted for under this program

FFY = federal fiscal year. MPO = metropolitan planning organization. N/A = not applicable.

Source: Boston Region MPO.

 

Table 3-4 shows MassDOT’s FFYs 2024–28 TIP investments—including both the number of projects or programs and the dollar amount—organized by MassDOT program. MassDOT’s investments are distributed across a variety of programs and will support bridge and pavement improvements, roadway improvements and reconstruction, new bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure, and safety improvements. More details on these investments are available on the project description pages in the second section of this chapter.

 

As detailed above for the MPO’s Regional Target Program, the BIL significantly increased the funding available to MassDOT for programming projects in the statewide Highway Program. Most notably, the BIL’s Bridge Formula Program allowed MassDOT to increase the funding allocated to federal-aid bridge projects. Furthermore, FFY 2026 represents the conclusion of grant anticipation notes (GANS) payments for MassDOT’s Accelerated Bridge Program (ABP).  As this program winds down, the passage of the 2021 Massachusetts Transportation Bond Bill and the new federal funding available through the BIL has allowed for the creation of MassDOT’s Next Generation Bridge Program (NGBP).

 

Like the ABP, the NGBP leverages state bonding capacity to accelerate the rehabilitation and replacement of critical or structurally deficient bridges across Massachusetts. In the FFYs 2024–28 TIP, 15 bridge projects are funded by MassDOT through the NGBP using state bond bill funds. These projects are shown in the TIP as debt payments on these bonds, which will use future federal formula funding.

 

Continued funding from the BIL supports increased investment across MassDOT’s other programs in the FFYs 2024–28 TIP, including the Bicycle and Pedestrian Program, the Intersection Improvements Program, the Interstate and Non-Interstate Pavement Programs, the Roadway Reconstruction Program, and the Safety Improvements Program. MassDOT’s Highway Program has increased by more than $1.1 billion between the FFYs 2023–27 TIP and the FFYs 2024–28 TIP to a total program size of more than $3.1 billion over five years.

 

 

Table 3-4
FFYs 2024–28 MassDOT Highway Program Investment Summary

MassDOT Program

Number of Projects

MassDOT Dollars Programmed

Bicycle and Pedestrian

8

$46,668,222

Federal-Aid Bridge Program

27

$544,133,685

Next Generation Bridge Program

15

$553,337,190

Earmarks or Discretionary Grants*

4

$94,623,709

Intersection Improvements

10

$33,530,370

Interstate Pavement

5

$98,117,990

Non-Interstate Pavement

6

$98,281,156

Roadway Reconstruction

12

$233,829,517

Safety Improvements

8

$49,121,035

Safe Routes to School

10

$13,258,486

Non-Federal Aid (NFA)

1

$80,040,000

Total

111

$1,587,058,890

Note: Funding amounts in this table include both federal and non-federal funds, including matching funds.

* Three projects receiving earmark funding are also receiving funding through other sources: Project 607977—Interstates 90/495 Interchange Reconstruction—is funded through MassDOT’s Roadway Reconstruction and NFA Programs; Project 605313—Natick Bridge Replacement over Route 9 and Interchange Improvements—is funded through MassDOT’s Bridge On-System NHS NB Program; and Project 608436—Ashland Rehabilitation and Rail Crossing Improvements on Cherry Street—is funded through MassDOT’s Railroad Crossings Program. Each project is counted in the tally for each funding category but is only counted once in the total number of projects funded.

 

Table 3-5 shows the MBTA’s programs and associated FFYs 2024–28 TIP funding amounts. Additional details on the MBTA’s programs and projects are in Tables 3-8 and 3-9. The MBTA’s capital program is substantially similar between FFYs 2023–27 TIP and the FFYs 2024–28 TIP, increasing from a total program size of $3.93 billion to $3.99 billion. Investments made through these programs allow the MBTA to continue to maintain and modernize its infrastructure in support of the agency’s role as the largest transit provider in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

 

The MBTA caters to a wide range of needs, serving the Boston region with commuter rail, light rail, subway, fixed-route bus, and paratransit services. The MBTA prioritizes projects that keep the existing transit system in a state of good repair, including the purchase of new rolling stock, accessibility and resiliency improvements to stations, the rehabilitation of bridges and tunnels, and the replacement of tracks and signals to support system-wide reliability. Limited system expansion projects are also undertaken through the MBTA’s federal capital program. Further information on how the MBTA’s investments support system safety and condition is available in Chapter 4.

 

Table 3-5
 FFYs 2024–28 MBTA Transit Program Investment Summary

Federal Transit Administration Program

MBTA Program

 MBTA Dollars Programmed

Section 5307: Urbanized Area Formula Grants

Bridge and Tunnel Program

$131,173,545

Section 5307: Urbanized Area Formula Grants

Revenue Vehicle Program

$599,990,395

Section 5307: Urbanized Area Formula Grants

Signals/Systems Upgrade Program

$288,413,826

Section 5307: Urbanized Area Formula Grants

Stations and Facilities Program

$229,532,339

Section 5337: Fixed Guideway/Bus Funds

Bridge and Tunnel Program

$480,612,299

Section 5337: Fixed Guideway/Bus Funds

Revenue Vehicle Program

$202,087,490

Section 5337: Fixed Guideway/Bus Funds

Signals/Systems Upgrade Program

$169,438,086

Section 5337: Fixed Guideway/Bus Funds

Stations and Facilities Program

$640,577,274

Section 5339: Bus and Bus Facilities Funds

Bus Program

$39,560,430

Other Federal Funds

Positive Train Control*

$469,150,000

Other Federal Funds

RRIF/TIFIA Financing Program

$737,500,000

Total

N/A

$3,988,035,684

Note: Federal Transit Administration formula funds (Sections 5307, 5337 and 5339) are based on estimated apportionments for FFYs 2024–28. These apportionments include additional funding to be made available through the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, based on current estimates. TIP programs and projects are based on a preliminary draft Capital Investment Plan (CIP) as of April 2022. Adjustments will be made to federal projects and budgets as the CIP process is finalized. Funding amounts in this table include both federal and non-federal funds, including matching funds.

* Positive Train Control investments are funded with RRIF funds.

† RRIF/TIFIA financing program funding is an initial estimate and will be refined as projects are identified and loans are finalized with the Build America Bureau.

FFY = federal fiscal year. N/A = not applicable. RRIF = Railroad Rehabilitation and Improvement Financing. TIFIA = Transportation Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act. TIP = Transportation Improvement Program.

Sources: MBTA and the Boston Region MPO.

 

Table 3-6 summarizes CATA and MWRTA investments included in the FFYs 2024–28 TIP, and more information is available on each agency’s investments in Tables 3-10 and 3-11. Though the MBTA provides commuter rail service to the Cape Ann communities of Rockport and Gloucester, CATA provides additional paratransit and fixed-route bus services to these communities and to Danvers, Peabody, Ipswich, Essex, and Beverly. CATA’s federal capital program supports its role in providing critical transportation alternatives to residents and visitors of the area, including through the replacement of buses, the modernization of facilities, and the maintenance of assets.

 

MWRTA similarly complements MBTA commuter rail service, operating fixed-route bus, on-demand microtransit, and commuter shuttle services to a number of communities in the MetroWest subregion. MWRTA’s federal capital program supports this mission by funding vehicle replacements, station and facility maintenance and improvements, and operating assistance for paratransit services, among other efforts. Other projects funded in MWRTA’s 2024–28 TIP include the electrification of the agency’s paratransit fleet and investments in technology to support travel training and customer service efforts.

 

Overall, the program size for CATA is substantially similar in the FFYs 2024–28 TIP to its figures in the FFYs 2023–27 TIP, while the program size for MWRTA increased by a greater amount. These agencies collectively received an approximately $9.7 million increase in funding levels in this TIP for a total program size of more than $65.3 million.

 

Table 3-6
FFYs 2024–28 CATA and MWRTA Transit Program Investment Summary

Regional Transit Authority

Federal Transit Administration Program

 RTA Dollars Programmed

CATA

Section 5307: Urbanized Area Formula Funding

$1,895,000

CATA

State Transportation Bond Capital Assistance

$4,182,500

CATA

Municipal and Local Assessments

$356,250

MWRTA

Section 5307: Urbanized Area Formula Funding

$14,557,400

MWRTA

Section 5339: Bus and Bus Facilities

$3,221,344

MWRTA

State Transportation Bond Capital Assistance

$7,361,432

MWRTA

Other Federal

$28,784,470

MWRTA

Other Non-Federal

$5,000,000

Total

N/A

$65,358,396

Note: Funding amounts in this table include both federal and non-federal funds, including matching funds.

CATA = Cape Ann Transportation Authority. FFY = federal fiscal year. MWRTA = Metro West Regional Transit Authority. N/A = not applicable. RTA = regional transit administration
Sources: CATA, MWRTA, and the Boston Region MPO.

 

Tables 3-7 through 3-11 build on the summary tables listed above by detailing investments made through both the Highway and Transit Programs by project, program, and funding year.

 

Table 3-7
FFYs 2024-28 TIP Highway Programming

STIP: 2024 - 2028 (D)
Year MassDOT Project ID MPO Municipality MassDOT Project Description District Funding Source Adjusted TFPC Total Programmed Funds Federal Funds Non-Federal Funds
Federal Fiscal Year 2024 $555,232,715 $277,338,132 $277,894,583
Section 1A / Regionally Prioritized Projects $126,991,048 $102,342,838 $24,648,210
Bridge On-system NHS $21,851,750 $17,481,400 $4,370,350
2024 110980 Boston Region Multiple NEWTON- WESTON- BRIDGE REHABILITATION, N-12-010=W-29-005, COMMONWEALTH AVENUE (ROUTE 30) OVER THE CHARLES RIVER 6 NHPP-PEN $21,851,750 $21,851,750 $17,481,400 $4,370,350
Roadway Reconstruction $42,150,471 $34,470,377 $7,680,094
2024 603739 Boston Region Wrentham WRENTHAM- CONSTRUCTION OF ROUTE I-495/ROUTE 1A RAMPS 5 HSIP $17,994,890 $4,500,000 $4,050,000 $450,000
2024 603739 Boston Region Wrentham WRENTHAM- CONSTRUCTION OF ROUTE I-495/ROUTE 1A RAMPS 5 STBG $17,994,890 $12,494,890 $9,995,912 $2,498,978
2024 603739 Boston Region Wrentham WRENTHAM- CONSTRUCTION OF ROUTE I-495/ROUTE 1A RAMPS 5 TAP $17,994,890 $1,000,000 $800,000 $200,000
2024 606226 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- RECONSTRUCTION OF RUTHERFORD AVENUE, FROM CITY SQUARE TO SULLIVAN SQUARE 6 NHPP $197,759,449 $0 $0 $0
2024 606226 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- RECONSTRUCTION OF RUTHERFORD AVENUE, FROM CITY SQUARE TO SULLIVAN SQUARE 6 STBG $197,759,449 $0 $0 $0
2024 606226 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- RECONSTRUCTION OF RUTHERFORD AVENUE, FROM CITY SQUARE TO SULLIVAN SQUARE 6 TAP $197,759,449 $0 $0 $0
2024 607777 Boston Region Watertown WATERTOWN- REHABILITATION OF MOUNT AUBURN STREET (ROUTE 16) 6 CMAQ $27,899,345 $1,000,000 $800,000 $200,000
2024 607777 Boston Region Watertown WATERTOWN- REHABILITATION OF MOUNT AUBURN STREET (ROUTE 16) 6 STBG $27,899,345 $2,494,249 $1,995,399 $498,850
2024 608007 Boston Region Multiple COHASSET- SCITUATE- CORRIDOR IMPROVEMENTS AND RELATED WORK ON JUSTICE CUSHING HIGHWAY (ROUTE 3A), FROM BEECHWOOD STREET TO HENRY TURNER BAILEY ROAD 5 HSIP $15,496,957 $3,000,000 $2,700,000 $300,000
2024 608007 Boston Region Multiple COHASSET- SCITUATE- CORRIDOR IMPROVEMENTS AND RELATED WORK ON JUSTICE CUSHING HIGHWAY (ROUTE 3A), FROM BEECHWOOD STREET TO HENRY TURNER BAILEY ROAD 5 STBG $15,496,957 $11,869,554 $9,495,643 $2,373,911
2024 608007 Boston Region Multiple COHASSET- SCITUATE- CORRIDOR IMPROVEMENTS AND RELATED WORK ON JUSTICE CUSHING HIGHWAY (ROUTE 3A), FROM BEECHWOOD STREET TO HENRY TURNER BAILEY ROAD 5 TAP $15,496,957 $627,403 $501,922 $125,481
2024 609054 Boston Region Littleton LITTLETON- RECONSTRUCTION OF FOSTER STREET 3 CMAQ $5,164,375 $1,500,000 $1,200,000 $300,000
2024 609054 Boston Region Littleton LITTLETON- RECONSTRUCTION OF FOSTER STREET 3 STBG $5,164,375 $2,664,375 $2,131,500 $532,875
2024 609054 Boston Region Littleton LITTLETON- RECONSTRUCTION OF FOSTER STREET 3 TAP $5,164,375 $1,000,000 $800,000 $200,000
Bicycle and Pedestrian $7,556,704 $6,045,363 $1,511,341
2024 609211 Boston Region Peabody PEABODY- INDEPENDENCE GREENWAY EXTENSION 4 CMAQ $7,524,204 $3,524,204 $2,819,363 $704,841
2024 609211 Boston Region Peabody PEABODY- INDEPENDENCE GREENWAY EXTENSION 4 TAP $7,524,204 $4,000,000 $3,200,000 $800,000
2024 S12805 Boston Region Canton CANTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS BIKE PROGRAM 6 CMAQ $22,500 $22,500 $18,000 $4,500
2024 S12806 Boston Region Canton CANTON CENTER BICYCLE RACKS 6 CMAQ $10,000 $10,000 $8,000 $2,000
Transit Grant Program $2,549,479 $2,039,583 $509,896
2024 S12114 Boston Region Canton ROYALL STREET SHUTTLE   CMAQ $534,820 $148,542 $118,834 $29,708
2024 S12124 Boston Region Multiple COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS PROGRAM   CMAQ $8,334,827 $0 $0 $0
2024 S12694 Boston Region Newton NEWMO MICROTRANSIT SERVICE EXPANSION 6 CMAQ $890,574 $268,246 $214,597 $53,649
2024 S12697 Boston Region Watertown PLEASANT STREET SHUTTLE SERVICE EXPANSION 6 CMAQ $1,002,198 $335,434 $268,347 $67,087
2024 S12699 Boston Region Stoneham STONEHAM SHUTTLE SERVICE 4 CMAQ $796,817 $261,439 $209,151 $52,288
2024 S12803 Boston Region Medford MEDFORD - BICYCLE PARKING (TIER 1) 4 CMAQ $29,600 $29,600 $23,680 $5,920
2024 S12804 Boston Region Medford MEDFORD - BLUEBIKES EXPANSION 4 CMAQ $118,643 $118,643 $94,914 $23,729
2024 S12818 Boston Region Acton ACTON PARKING MANAGEMENT SYSTEM 3 CMAQ $15,000 $15,000 $12,000 $3,000
2024 S12823 Boston Region Boston BOSTON - ELECTRIC BLUEBIKES ADOPTION 6 CMAQ $1,020,000 $1,020,000 $816,000 $204,000
2024 S12824 Boston Region Cambridge CAMBRIDGE - ELECTRIC BLUEBIKES ADOPTION 6 CMAQ $352,575 $352,575 $282,060 $70,515
Flex to FTA $52,882,644 $42,306,115 $10,576,529
2024 S12700 Boston Region Multiple CATA ON DEMAND MICROTRANSIT SERVICE EXPANSION 4 CMAQ $813,291 $265,065 $212,052 $53,013
2024 S12701 Boston Region Multiple MWRTA CATCHCONNECT MICROTRANSIT SERVICE EXPANSION 3 CMAQ $450,163 $149,425 $119,540 $29,885
2024 S12703 Boston Region Multiple MONTACHUSETT RTA MICROTRANSIT SERVICE 3 CMAQ $1,316,061 $430,354 $344,283 $86,071
2024 S12705 Boston Region Lynn LYNN STATION IMPROVEMENTS PHASE II 4 STBG $48,100,000 $13,600,000 $10,880,000 $2,720,000
2024 S12802 Boston Region Lynn LYNN - BROAD STREET CORRIDOR TRANSIT SIGNAL PRIORITY 4 CMAQ $297,800 $297,800 $238,240 $59,560
2024 S12807 Boston Region Multiple MWRTA CATCHCONNECT MICROTRANSIT EXPANSION PHASE 2 3 CMAQ $380,477 $140,000 $112,000 $28,000
2024 S12819 Boston Region Boston JACKSON SQUARE STATION ACCESSIBILITY IMPROVEMENTS 6 CMAQ $26,250,000 $12,250,000 $9,800,000 $2,450,000
2024 S12821 Boston Region Multiple RAIL TRANSFORMATION - EARLY ACTION ITEMS - READING STATION AND WILBUR INTERLOCKING 4 CMAQ $14,000,000 $14,000,000 $11,200,000 $2,800,000
2024 S12822 Boston Region Boston COLUMBUS AVENUE BUS LANES PHASE 2 6 CMAQ $11,750,000 $11,750,000 $9,400,000 $2,350,000
Section 1B / Earmark or Discretionary Grant Funded Projects $126,391,302 $112,872,525 $13,518,777
Bridge On-System NHS NB $25,769,762 $20,615,810 $5,153,952
2024 605313 Boston Region Natick NATICK- BRIDGE REPLACEMENT, N-03-020, ROUTE 27 (NORTH MAIN STREET) OVER ROUTE 9 (WORCESTER STREET) AND INTERCHANGE IMPROVEMENTS 3 HIP-BR $75,677,350 $16,879,931 $13,503,945 $3,375,986
2024 606902 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- BRIDGE REPLACEMENT, B-16-181, WEST ROXBURY PARKWAY OVER MBTA 6 HIP-BR $8,889,831 $8,889,831 $7,111,865 $1,777,966
Earmark Discretionary $84,714,980 $79,531,468 $5,183,512
2024 605313 Boston Region Natick NATICK- BRIDGE REPLACEMENT, N-03-020, ROUTE 27 (NORTH MAIN STREET) OVER ROUTE 9 (WORCESTER STREET) AND INTERCHANGE IMPROVEMENTS 3 CRRSAA $75,677,350 $58,797,419 $58,797,419 $0
2024 607977 Boston Region Multiple HOPKINTON- WESTBOROUGH- RECONSTRUCTION OF I-90/I-495 INTERCHANGE 3 HIP $300,942,837 $0 $0 $0
2024 607977 Boston Region Multiple HOPKINTON- WESTBOROUGH- RECONSTRUCTION OF I-90/I-495 INTERCHANGE 3 HIP-BR $300,942,837 $25,917,561 $20,734,049 $5,183,512
Bridge On-system Non-NHS NB $3,635,960 $2,908,768 $727,192
2024 608522 Boston Region Middleton MIDDLETON- BRIDGE REPLACEMENT, M-20-003, ROUTE 62 (MAPLE STREET) OVER IPSWICH RIVER 4 HIP-BR $3,635,960 $3,635,960 $2,908,768 $727,192
Bridge Systematic Maintenance NB $12,270,600 $9,816,480 $2,454,120
2024 613196 Boston Region Burlington BURLINGTON- LYNNFIELD- WAKEFIELD- WOBURN- BRIDGE PRESERVATION OF 10 BRIDGES CARRYING I-95 4 HIP-BR $3,999,600 $3,999,600 $3,199,680 $799,920
2024 613209 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- BRIDGE PRESERVATION, B-16-236 (39M, 39P, 39U, 39W, 39Y), 5 BRIDGES CARRYING STATE ROUTE 1A (EAST BOSTON EXPRESSWAY NB/SB) AND RAMPS 6 HIP-BR $6,525,000 $6,525,000 $5,220,000 $1,305,000
2024 613211 Boston Region Medford MEDFORD- BRIDGE PRESERVATION OF 10 BRIDGES CARRYING I-93 4 HIP-BR $1,746,000 $1,746,000 $1,396,800 $349,200
Section 2A / State Prioritized Reliability Projects $129,160,689 $23,362,907 $105,797,782
Bridge On-system NHS $90,404,329 $0 $90,404,329
2024 606496 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- BRIDGE REHABILITATION, B-16-052, BOWKER OVERPASS OVER MASS PIKE, MBTA/CSX, & IPSWICH STREET AND RAMPS (BINS 4FD, 4FG, 4FE, 4FF & 4FJ) 6 NGBP $90,404,329 $90,404,329 $0 $90,404,329
Bridge On-system Non-NHS $12,538,835 $0 $12,538,835
2024 606901 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- BRIDGE REPLACEMENT, B-16-109, RIVER STREET BRIDGE OVER MBTA/AMTRAK 6 NGBP $12,538,835 $12,538,835 $0 $12,538,835
Bridge Off-system $2,328,651 $1,862,921 $465,730
2024 609438 Boston Region Canton CANTON- BRIDGE REPLACEMENT, C-02-042, REVERE COURT OVER WEST BRANCH OF  THE NEPONSET RIVER 6 STBG-BR-Off $2,328,651 $2,328,651 $1,862,921 $465,730
Interstate Pavement $23,888,874 $21,499,987 $2,388,887
2024 612034 Boston Region Woburn WOBURN- INTERSTATE PAVEMENT PRESERVATION AND RELATED WORK ON I-95 4 NHPP-I $7,849,699 $7,849,699 $7,064,729 $784,970
2024 612048 Boston Region Waltham WALTHAM- INTERSTATE MAINTENANCE AND RELATED WORK ON I-95 4 NHPP-I $16,039,175 $16,039,175 $14,435,258 $1,603,918
Section 2B / State Prioritized Modernization Projects $43,066,512 $38,759,861 $4,306,651
Intersection Improvements $15,386,886 $13,848,197 $1,538,689
2024 607342 Boston Region Milton MILTON- INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENTS AT ROUTE 28 (RANDOLPH AVENUE) & CHICKATAWBUT ROAD 6 HSIP $9,112,736 $9,112,736 $8,201,462 $911,274
2024 608562 Boston Region Somerville SOMERVILLE- SIGNAL AND INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENT ON I-93 AT MYSTIC AVENUE AND MCGRATH HIGHWAY (TOP 200 CRASH LOCATION) 4 VUS $7,452,168 $2,500,000 $2,250,000 $250,000
2024 608562 Boston Region Somerville SOMERVILLE- SIGNAL AND INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENT ON I-93 AT MYSTIC AVENUE AND MCGRATH HIGHWAY (TOP 200 CRASH LOCATION) 4 HSIP $7,452,168 $3,774,150 $3,396,735 $377,415
Roadway Reconstruction $27,679,626 $24,911,663 $2,767,963
2024 607977 Boston Region Multiple HOPKINTON- WESTBOROUGH- RECONSTRUCTION OF I-90/I-495 INTERCHANGE 3 NHPP-I $300,942,837 $16,000,000 $14,400,000 $1,600,000
2024 607977 Boston Region Multiple HOPKINTON- WESTBOROUGH- RECONSTRUCTION OF I-90/I-495 INTERCHANGE 3 NFP-I $300,942,837 $11,679,626 $10,511,663 $1,167,963
Section 2C / State Prioritized Expansion Projects $0 $0 $0
Bicycle and Pedestrian $0 $0 $0
2024 611982 Boston Region Medford MEDFORD- SHARED USE PATH CONNECTION AT THE ROUTE 28/WELLINGTON UNDERPASS 4 CMAQ $4,560,833 $0 $0 $0
Section 3B / Non-Federal Aid Funded $129,623,164 $0 $129,623,164
Bridge On-system NHS $90,404,329 $0 $90,404,329
2024 606496 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- BRIDGE REHABILITATION, B-16-052, BOWKER OVERPASS OVER MASS PIKE, MBTA/CSX, & IPSWICH STREET AND RAMPS (BINS 4FD, 4FG, 4FE, 4FF & 4FJ) 6 NGBP $90,404,329 $90,404,329 $0 $90,404,329
Bridge On-system Non-NHS $12,538,835 $0 $12,538,835
2024 606901 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- BRIDGE REPLACEMENT, B-16-109, RIVER STREET BRIDGE OVER MBTA/AMTRAK 6 NGBP $12,538,835 $12,538,835 $0 $12,538,835
NFA $26,680,000 $0 $26,680,000
2024 607977 Boston Region Multiple HOPKINTON- WESTBOROUGH- RECONSTRUCTION OF I-90/I-495 INTERCHANGE 3 NFA $300,942,837 $26,680,000 $0 $26,680,000
STIP: 2024 - 2028 (D)
Year MassDOT Project ID MPO Municipality MassDOT Project Description District Funding Source Adjusted TFPC Total Programmed Funds Federal Funds Non-Federal Funds
Federal Fiscal Year 2025 $495,072,137 $209,847,964 $285,224,173
Section 1A / Regionally Prioritized Projects $125,975,489 $102,160,356 $23,815,134
Roadway Reconstruction $78,662,949 $63,530,359 $15,132,590
2025 605168 Boston Region Hingham HINGHAM- IMPROVEMENTS ON ROUTE 3A FROM OTIS STREET/COLE ROAD  INCLUDING SUMMER STREET AND ROTARY; ROCKLAND STREET TO GEORGE WASHINGTON BOULEVARD.   5 STBG $15,018,900 $13,518,900 $10,815,120 $2,703,780
2025 605168 Boston Region Hingham HINGHAM- IMPROVEMENTS ON ROUTE 3A FROM OTIS STREET/COLE ROAD  INCLUDING SUMMER STREET AND ROTARY; ROCKLAND STREET TO GEORGE WASHINGTON BOULEVARD.   5 TAP $15,018,900 $1,500,000 $1,200,000 $300,000
2025 605743 Boston Region Ipswich IPSWICH- RESURFACING & RELATED WORK ON CENTRAL & SOUTH MAIN STREETS 4 STBG $11,728,698 $0 $0 $0
2025 605743 Boston Region Ipswich IPSWICH- RESURFACING & RELATED WORK ON CENTRAL & SOUTH MAIN STREETS 4 TAP $11,728,698 $0 $0 $0
2025 606226 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- RECONSTRUCTION OF RUTHERFORD AVENUE, FROM CITY SQUARE TO SULLIVAN SQUARE 6 NHPP $197,759,449 $0 $0 $0
2025 606226 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- RECONSTRUCTION OF RUTHERFORD AVENUE, FROM CITY SQUARE TO SULLIVAN SQUARE 6 STBG $197,759,449 $0 $0 $0
2025 606226 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- RECONSTRUCTION OF RUTHERFORD AVENUE, FROM CITY SQUARE TO SULLIVAN SQUARE 6 TAP $197,759,449 $0 $0 $0
2025 606453 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- IMPROVEMENTS ON BOYLSTON STREET, FROM INTERSECTION OF BROOKLINE AVENUE & PARK DRIVE TO IPSWICH STREET 6 CMAQ $8,665,052 $5,000,000 $4,000,000 $1,000,000
2025 606453 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- IMPROVEMENTS ON BOYLSTON STREET, FROM INTERSECTION OF BROOKLINE AVENUE & PARK DRIVE TO IPSWICH STREET 6 STBG $8,665,052 $2,851,808 $2,281,446 $570,362
2025 606453 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- IMPROVEMENTS ON BOYLSTON STREET, FROM INTERSECTION OF BROOKLINE AVENUE & PARK DRIVE TO IPSWICH STREET 6 TAP $8,665,052 $813,244 $650,595 $162,649
2025 608051 Boston Region Wilmington WILMINGTON- RECONSTRUCTION ON ROUTE 38 (MAIN STREET), FROM ROUTE 62 TO THE WOBURN C.L. 4 CMAQ $23,731,429 $2,200,000 $1,760,000 $440,000
2025 608051 Boston Region Wilmington WILMINGTON- RECONSTRUCTION ON ROUTE 38 (MAIN STREET), FROM ROUTE 62 TO THE WOBURN C.L. 4 HSIP $23,731,429 $1,000,000 $900,000 $100,000
2025 608051 Boston Region Wilmington WILMINGTON- RECONSTRUCTION ON ROUTE 38 (MAIN STREET), FROM ROUTE 62 TO THE WOBURN C.L. 4 STBG $23,731,429 $20,531,429 $16,425,143 $4,106,286
2025 609252 Boston Region Lynn LYNN- REHABILITATION OF ESSEX STREET 4 CMAQ $19,698,640 $10,500,000 $8,400,000 $2,100,000
2025 609252 Boston Region Lynn LYNN- REHABILITATION OF ESSEX STREET 4 HSIP $19,698,640 $4,000,000 $3,600,000 $400,000
2025 609252 Boston Region Lynn LYNN- REHABILITATION OF ESSEX STREET 4 STBG $19,698,640 $5,198,640 $4,158,912 $1,039,728
2025 609257 Boston Region Everett EVERETT- RECONSTRUCTION OF BEACHAM STREET 4 HSIP $10,548,928 $1,000,000 $900,000 $100,000
2025 609257 Boston Region Everett EVERETT- RECONSTRUCTION OF BEACHAM STREET 4 STBG $10,548,928 $7,648,928 $6,119,142 $1,529,786
2025 609257 Boston Region Everett EVERETT- RECONSTRUCTION OF BEACHAM STREET 4 TAP $10,548,928 $1,900,000 $1,520,000 $380,000
2025 S12820 Boston Region   BIKESHARE SUPPORT SET ASIDE   STBG $6,000,000 $1,000,000 $800,000 $200,000
Intersection Improvements $1,978,080 $1,582,464 $395,616
2025 605857 Boston Region Norwood NORWOOD- INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENTS @ ROUTE 1 & UNIVERSITY AVENUE/EVERETT STREET  5 CMAQ $28,699,272 $0 $0 $0
2025 605857 Boston Region Norwood NORWOOD- INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENTS @ ROUTE 1 & UNIVERSITY AVENUE/EVERETT STREET  5 HSIP $28,699,272 $0 $0 $0
2025 605857 Boston Region Norwood NORWOOD- INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENTS @ ROUTE 1 & UNIVERSITY AVENUE/EVERETT STREET  5 NHPP $28,699,272 $0 $0 $0
2025 605857 Boston Region Norwood NORWOOD- INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENTS @ ROUTE 1 & UNIVERSITY AVENUE/EVERETT STREET  5 STBG $28,699,272 $0 $0 $0
2025 608067 Boston Region Woburn WOBURN- INTERSECTION RECONSTRUCTION AT ROUTE 3 (CAMBRIDGE ROAD) & BEDFORD ROAD AND SOUTH BEDFORD STREET 4 CMAQ $1,978,080 $1,978,080 $1,582,464 $395,616
Railroad Crossings $742,315 $742,315 $0
2025 608436 Boston Region   ASHLAND- REHABILITATION AND RAIL CROSSING IMPROVEMENTS ON CHERRY STREET 3 RRHE $1,222,315 $742,315 $742,315 $0
Safety Improvements $6,315,013 $5,683,512 $631,501
2025 609532 Boston Region Chelsea CHELSEA- TARGETED SAFETY IMPROVEMENTS AND RELATED WORK ON BROADWAY, FROM WILLIAMS STREET TO CITY HALL AVENUE 6 HSIP $6,315,013 $6,315,013 $5,683,512 $631,501
Bicycle and Pedestrian $15,777,132 $12,621,706 $3,155,426
2025 610544 Boston Region Peabody PEABODY- MULTI-USE PATH CONSTRUCTION OF INDEPENDENCE GREENWAY AT I-95 AND ROUTE 1 4 CMAQ $15,777,132 $5,500,000 $4,400,000 $1,100,000
2025 610544 Boston Region Peabody PEABODY- MULTI-USE PATH CONSTRUCTION OF INDEPENDENCE GREENWAY AT I-95 AND ROUTE 1 4 STBG $15,777,132 $7,277,132 $5,821,706 $1,455,426
2025 610544 Boston Region Peabody PEABODY- MULTI-USE PATH CONSTRUCTION OF INDEPENDENCE GREENWAY AT I-95 AND ROUTE 1 4 TAP $15,777,132 $3,000,000 $2,400,000 $600,000
Flex to FTA $16,913,405 $13,530,724 $3,382,681
2025 S12113 Boston Region   TRANSIT MODERNIZATION PROGRAM   CMAQ $21,500,000 $2,000,000 $1,600,000 $400,000
2025 S12700 Boston Region Multiple CATA ON DEMAND MICROTRANSIT SERVICE EXPANSION 4 CMAQ $813,291 $214,776 $171,821 $42,955
2025 S12701 Boston Region Multiple MWRTA CATCHCONNECT MICROTRANSIT SERVICE EXPANSION 3 CMAQ $450,163 $159,488 $127,590 $31,898
2025 S12703 Boston Region Multiple MONTACHUSETT RTA MICROTRANSIT SERVICE 3 CMAQ $1,316,061 $406,641 $325,313 $81,328
2025 S12807 Boston Region Multiple MWRTA CATCHCONNECT MICROTRANSIT EXPANSION PHASE 2 3 CMAQ $380,477 $132,500 $106,000 $26,500
2025 S12819 Boston Region Boston JACKSON SQUARE STATION ACCESSIBILITY IMPROVEMENTS 6 CMAQ $26,250,000 $14,000,000 $11,200,000 $2,800,000
Transit Grant Program $1,586,595 $1,269,276 $317,319
2025 S12124 Boston Region Multiple COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS PROGRAM   CMAQ $8,334,827 $942,804 $754,243 $188,561
2025 S12694 Boston Region Newton NEWMO MICROTRANSIT SERVICE EXPANSION 6 CMAQ $890,574 $209,663 $167,730 $41,933
2025 S12697 Boston Region Watertown PLEASANT STREET SHUTTLE SERVICE EXPANSION 6 CMAQ $1,002,198 $228,939 $183,151 $45,788
2025 S12699 Boston Region Stoneham STONEHAM SHUTTLE SERVICE 4 CMAQ $796,817 $205,189 $164,151 $41,038
Roadway Improvements $4,000,000 $3,200,000 $800,000
2025 S12825 Boston Region Multiple BOSTON MPO REGION - FFY2025 PROJECT DESIGN PILOT Multiple STBG $4,000,000 $4,000,000 $3,200,000 $800,000
Section 1B / Earmark or Discretionary Grant Funded Projects $34,984,926 $28,083,941 $6,900,985
Earmark Discretionary $30,480,000 $24,480,000 $6,000,000
2025 607977 Boston Region Multiple HOPKINTON- WESTBOROUGH- RECONSTRUCTION OF I-90/I-495 INTERCHANGE 3 HIP $300,942,837 $0 $0 $0
2025 607977 Boston Region Multiple HOPKINTON- WESTBOROUGH- RECONSTRUCTION OF I-90/I-495 INTERCHANGE 3 HIP-BR $300,942,837 $30,000,000 $24,000,000 $6,000,000
2025 608436 Boston Region   ASHLAND- REHABILITATION AND RAIL CROSSING IMPROVEMENTS ON CHERRY STREET 3 HPP-100 $1,222,315 $480,000 $480,000 $0
Bridge On-system Non-NHS NB $4,504,926 $3,603,941 $900,985
2025 608197 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- BRIDGE REHABILITATION, B-16-107, CANTERBURY STREET OVER AMTRAK RAILROAD 6 HIP-BR $4,504,926 $4,504,926 $3,603,941 $900,985
Section 2A / State Prioritized Reliability Projects $159,642,391 $43,187,022 $116,455,369
Bridge On-system NHS $81,232,390 $23,120,374 $58,112,016
2025 604564 Boston Region Maynard MAYNARD- BRIDGE REPLACEMENT, M-10-004, ROUTE 62 (MAIN STREET) OVER THE ASSABET RIVER 3 NGBP $6,036,680 $6,036,680 $0 $6,036,680
2025 607684 Boston Region Braintree BRAINTREE- BRIDGE REPLACEMENT, B-21-017, WASHINGTON STREET (ST 37) OVER MBTA/CSX RAILROAD 6 NGBP $7,695,470 $7,695,470 $0 $7,695,470
2025 608703 Boston Region Wilmington WILMINGTON- BRIDGE REPLACEMENT, W-38-029 (2KV), ST 129 LOWELL STREET OVER I 93 4 NHPP-PEN $16,592,888 $16,592,888 $13,274,310 $3,318,578
2025 610776 Boston Region Cambridge CAMBRIDGE- SUPERSTRUCTURE REPLACEMENT, C-01-031, US ROUTE 3/ROUTE 16/ROUTE 2 OVER MBTA REDLINE 6 NHPP-PEN $6,604,208 $6,604,208 $5,283,366 $1,320,842
2025 610782 Boston Region Multiple DANVERS- MIDDLETON- BRIDGE REPLACEMENT, D-03-009=M-20-005, ANDOVER STREET (SR 114) OVER IPSWICH RIVER 4 NHPP-PEN $5,703,371 $5,703,371 $4,562,697 $1,140,674
2025 612028 Boston Region Stoneham STONEHAM- DECK REPLACEMENT & SUPERSTRUCTURE REPAIRS, S-27-006 (2L2), (ST 28) FELLSWAY WEST OVER I-93 4 NGBP $3,120,000 $3,120,000 $0 $3,120,000
2025 612182 Boston Region Newton NEWTON- BRIDGE REPLACEMENT, N-12-040, BOYLSTON STREET OVER GREEN LINE D 6 NGBP $15,206,778 $15,206,778 $0 $15,206,778
2025 612184 Boston Region Revere REVERE- BRIDGE REPLACEMENT, R-05-015, REVERE BEACH PARKWAY OVER BROADWAY 4 NGBP $20,272,995 $20,272,995 $0 $20,272,995
Non-Interstate Pavement $21,696,726 $17,357,381 $4,339,345
2025 608498 Boston Region Multiple QUINCY- WEYMOUTH- BRAINTREE- RESURFACING AND RELATED WORK ON ROUTE 53 6 NHPP $6,635,050 $6,635,050 $5,308,040 $1,327,010
2025 609399 Boston Region Randolph RANDOLPH- RESURFACING AND RELATED WORK ON ROUTE 28 6 NHPP $7,194,377 $7,194,377 $5,755,502 $1,438,875
2025 610722 Boston Region Multiple ACTON- BOXBOROUGH- LITTLETON- PAVEMENT PRESERVATION ROUTE 2 3 NHPP $7,867,299 $7,867,299 $6,293,839 $1,573,460
Bridge On-system Non-NHS $53,326,690 $0 $53,326,690
2025 608952 Boston Region Chelsea CHELSEA- BRIDGE SUPERSTRUCTURE REPLACMENT C-09-013, WASHINGTON AVENUE, CARTER STREET & COUNTY ROAD/ROUTE 1 6 NGBP $20,438,134 $20,438,134 $0 $20,438,134
2025 612173 Boston Region Bellingham BELLINGHAM- BRIDGE REPLACEMENT, B-06-022, MAPLE STREET OVER I-495 3 NGBP $14,270,687 $14,270,687 $0 $14,270,687
2025 612178 Boston Region Natick NATICK- BRIDGE REPLACEMENT, N-03-010, SPEEN STREET OVER RR MBTA/CSX 3 NGBP $6,722,582 $6,722,582 $0 $6,722,582
2025 612196 Boston Region Braintree BRAINTREE- BRIDGE REPLACEMENT, B-21-067, JW MAHER HIGHWAY OVER MONATIQUOT RIVER 6 NGBP $11,895,287 $11,895,287 $0 $11,895,287
Bridge Off-system $3,386,585 $2,709,268 $677,317
2025 609467 Boston Region Multiple HAMILTON- IPSWICH- SUPERSTRUCTURE REPLACEMENT, H-03-002=I-01-006, WINTHROP STREET OVER IPSWICH RIVER 4 STBG-BR-Off $3,386,585 $3,386,585 $2,709,268 $677,317
Section 2B / State Prioritized Modernization Projects $34,141,530 $30,025,295 $4,116,235
Intersection Improvements $0 $0 $0
2025 607342 Boston Region Milton MILTON- INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENTS AT ROUTE 28 (RANDOLPH AVENUE) & CHICKATAWBUT ROAD 6 HSIP $9,112,736 $0 $0 $0
Roadway Reconstruction $30,619,271 $27,207,488 $3,411,783
2025 607977 Boston Region Multiple HOPKINTON- WESTBOROUGH- RECONSTRUCTION OF I-90/I-495 INTERCHANGE 3 NHPP-I $300,942,837 $9,000,000 $8,100,000 $900,000
2025 607977 Boston Region Multiple HOPKINTON- WESTBOROUGH- RECONSTRUCTION OF I-90/I-495 INTERCHANGE 3 NFP-I $300,942,837 $18,120,711 $16,308,640 $1,812,071
2025 609516 Boston Region Burlington BURLINGTON- IMPROVEMENTS AT I-95 (ROUTE 128)/ROUTE 3 INTERCHANGE 4 NHPP $3,498,560 $3,498,560 $2,798,848 $699,712
Safe Routes to School $3,522,259 $2,817,807 $704,452
2025 609531 Boston Region Arlington ARLINGTON- STRATTON SCHOOL IMPROVEMENTS (SRTS) 4 TAP $1,302,209 $1,302,209 $1,041,767 $260,442
2025 611997 Boston Region Newton NEWTON- HORACE MANN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL IMPROVEMENTS (SRTS) 6 TAP $861,238 $861,237 $688,990 $172,247
2025 612001 Boston Region Medford MEDFORD- MILTON FULLER ROBERTS ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (SRTS) 4 TAP $1,020,484 $1,020,484 $816,387 $204,097
2025 612100 Boston Region Revere REVERE- IMPROVEMENTS AT BEACHMONT VETERANS ELEMENTARY (SRTS) 4 TAP $338,329 $338,329 $270,663 $67,666
Section 2C / State Prioritized Expansion Projects $7,989,188 $6,391,350 $1,597,838
Bicycle and Pedestrian $7,989,188 $6,391,350 $1,597,838
2025 610680 Boston Region Natick NATICK- LAKE COCHITUATE PATH 3 CMAQ $3,428,355 $3,428,355 $2,742,684 $685,671
2025 611982 Boston Region Medford MEDFORD- SHARED USE PATH CONNECTION AT THE ROUTE 28/WELLINGTON UNDERPASS 4 CMAQ $4,560,833 $4,560,833 $3,648,666 $912,167
Section 3B / Non-Federal Aid Funded $132,338,613 $0 $132,338,613
Bridge On-system NHS $52,331,923 $0 $52,331,923
2025 604564 Boston Region Maynard MAYNARD- BRIDGE REPLACEMENT, M-10-004, ROUTE 62 (MAIN STREET) OVER THE ASSABET RIVER 3 NGBP $6,036,680 $6,036,680 $0 $6,036,680
2025 607684 Boston Region Braintree BRAINTREE- BRIDGE REPLACEMENT, B-21-017, WASHINGTON STREET (ST 37) OVER MBTA/CSX RAILROAD 6 NGBP $7,695,470 $7,695,470 $0 $7,695,470
2025 612028 Boston Region Stoneham STONEHAM- DECK REPLACEMENT & SUPERSTRUCTURE REPAIRS, S-27-006 (2L2), (ST 28) FELLSWAY WEST OVER I-93 4 NGBP $3,120,000 $3,120,000 $0 $3,120,000
2025 612182 Boston Region Newton NEWTON- BRIDGE REPLACEMENT, N-12-040, BOYLSTON STREET OVER GREEN LINE D 6 NGBP $15,206,778 $15,206,778 $0 $15,206,778
2025 612184 Boston Region Revere REVERE- BRIDGE REPLACEMENT, R-05-015, REVERE BEACH PARKWAY OVER BROADWAY 4 NGBP $20,272,995 $20,272,995 $0 $20,272,995
NFA $26,680,000 $0 $26,680,000
2025 607977 Boston Region Multiple HOPKINTON- WESTBOROUGH- RECONSTRUCTION OF I-90/I-495 INTERCHANGE 3 NFA $300,942,837 $26,680,000 $0 $26,680,000
Bridge On-system Non-NHS $53,326,690 $0 $53,326,690
2025 608952 Boston Region Chelsea CHELSEA- BRIDGE SUPERSTRUCTURE REPLACMENT C-09-013, WASHINGTON AVENUE, CARTER STREET & COUNTY ROAD/ROUTE 1 6 NGBP $20,438,134 $20,438,134 $0 $20,438,134
2025 612173 Boston Region Bellingham BELLINGHAM- BRIDGE REPLACEMENT, B-06-022, MAPLE STREET OVER I-495 3 NGBP $14,270,687 $14,270,687 $0 $14,270,687
2025 612178 Boston Region Natick NATICK- BRIDGE REPLACEMENT, N-03-010, SPEEN STREET OVER RR MBTA/CSX 3 NGBP $6,722,582 $6,722,582 $0 $6,722,582
2025 612196 Boston Region Braintree BRAINTREE- BRIDGE REPLACEMENT, B-21-067, JW MAHER HIGHWAY OVER MONATIQUOT RIVER 6 NGBP $11,895,287 $11,895,287 $0 $11,895,287
STIP: 2024 - 2028 (D)
Year MassDOT Project ID MPO Municipality MassDOT Project Description District Funding Source Adjusted TFPC Total Programmed Funds Federal Funds Non-Federal Funds
Federal Fiscal Year 2026 $505,966,124 $394,371,383 $111,594,741
Section 1A / Regionally Prioritized Projects $124,667,241 $100,565,496 $24,101,746
Roadway Reconstruction $64,435,864 $52,098,691 $12,337,173
2026 605743 Boston Region Ipswich IPSWICH- RESURFACING & RELATED WORK ON CENTRAL & SOUTH MAIN STREETS 4 STBG $11,728,698 $4,971,338 $3,977,070 $994,268
2026 605743 Boston Region Ipswich IPSWICH- RESURFACING & RELATED WORK ON CENTRAL & SOUTH MAIN STREETS 4 TAP $11,728,698 $730,738 $584,590 $146,148
2026 606226 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- RECONSTRUCTION OF RUTHERFORD AVENUE, FROM CITY SQUARE TO SULLIVAN SQUARE 6 NHPP $197,759,449 $0 $0 $0
2026 606226 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- RECONSTRUCTION OF RUTHERFORD AVENUE, FROM CITY SQUARE TO SULLIVAN SQUARE 6 STBG $197,759,449 $0 $0 $0
2026 606226 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- RECONSTRUCTION OF RUTHERFORD AVENUE, FROM CITY SQUARE TO SULLIVAN SQUARE 6 TAP $197,759,449 $0 $0 $0
2026 608045 Boston Region Milford MILFORD- REHABILITATION ON ROUTE 16, FROM ROUTE 109 TO BEAVER STREET 3 HSIP $9,758,201 $1,500,000 $1,350,000 $150,000
2026 608045 Boston Region Milford MILFORD- REHABILITATION ON ROUTE 16, FROM ROUTE 109 TO BEAVER STREET 3 STBG $9,758,201 $8,258,201 $6,606,561 $1,651,640
2026 608954 Boston Region Weston WESTON- RECONSTRUCTION ON ROUTE 30 6 STBG $16,420,119 $11,420,119 $9,136,095 $2,284,024
2026 608954 Boston Region Weston WESTON- RECONSTRUCTION ON ROUTE 30 6 TAP $16,420,119 $5,000,000 $4,000,000 $1,000,000
2026 609437 Boston Region Multiple SALEM- PEABODY- BOSTON STREET IMPROVEMENTS 4 STBG $14,172,868 $14,172,868 $11,338,294 $2,834,574
2026 610662 Boston Region Woburn WOBURN- ROADWAY AND INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENTS AT WOBURN COMMON, ROUTE 38 (MAIN STREET), WINN STREET, PLEASANT STREET AND MONTVALE AVENUE 4 HSIP $17,382,600 $4,000,000 $3,600,000 $400,000
2026 610662 Boston Region Woburn WOBURN- ROADWAY AND INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENTS AT WOBURN COMMON, ROUTE 38 (MAIN STREET), WINN STREET, PLEASANT STREET AND MONTVALE AVENUE 4 STBG $17,382,600 $13,382,600 $10,706,080 $2,676,520
2026 S12820 Boston Region   BIKESHARE SUPPORT SET ASIDE   STBG $6,000,000 $1,000,000 $800,000 $200,000
Intersection Improvements $13,311,175 $10,930,643 $2,380,532
2026 605857 Boston Region Norwood NORWOOD- INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENTS @ ROUTE 1 & UNIVERSITY AVENUE/EVERETT STREET  5 CMAQ $28,699,272 $0 $0 $0
2026 605857 Boston Region Norwood NORWOOD- INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENTS @ ROUTE 1 & UNIVERSITY AVENUE/EVERETT STREET  5 HSIP $28,699,272 $631,724 $568,552 $63,172
2026 605857 Boston Region Norwood NORWOOD- INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENTS @ ROUTE 1 & UNIVERSITY AVENUE/EVERETT STREET  5 NHPP $28,699,272 $4,998,901 $3,999,121 $999,780
2026 605857 Boston Region Norwood NORWOOD- INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENTS @ ROUTE 1 & UNIVERSITY AVENUE/EVERETT STREET  5 STBG $28,699,272 $5,495,247 $4,396,198 $1,099,049
2026 608940 Boston Region Weston WESTON- INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENTS BOSTON POST ROAD (ROUTE 20) AT WELLESLEY STREET  6 HSIP $2,185,303 $2,185,303 $1,966,773 $218,530
Bicycle and Pedestrian $21,288,202 $17,030,562 $4,257,640
2026 609204 Boston Region Belmont BELMONT- COMMUNITY PATH, BELMONT COMPONENT OF THE MCRT (PHASE I) 4 CMAQ $21,288,202 $7,288,202 $5,830,562 $1,457,640
2026 609204 Boston Region Belmont BELMONT- COMMUNITY PATH, BELMONT COMPONENT OF THE MCRT (PHASE I) 4 STBG $21,288,202 $9,000,000 $7,200,000 $1,800,000
2026 609204 Boston Region Belmont BELMONT- COMMUNITY PATH, BELMONT COMPONENT OF THE MCRT (PHASE I) 4 TAP $21,288,202 $5,000,000 $4,000,000 $1,000,000
Roadway Improvements $1,400,000 $1,120,000 $280,000
2026 612989 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- BRIDGE PRESERVATION, B-16-066 (38D), CAMBRIDGE STREET OVER MBTA 6 CMAQ $16,632,000 $1,400,000 $1,120,000 $280,000
Bridge On-system NHS $15,232,000 $12,185,600 $3,046,400
2026 612989 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- BRIDGE PRESERVATION, B-16-066 (38D), CAMBRIDGE STREET OVER MBTA 6 NHPP-PEN $16,632,000 $15,232,000 $12,185,600 $3,046,400
Flex to FTA $6,607,977 $5,286,382 $1,321,595
2026 S12113 Boston Region   TRANSIT MODERNIZATION PROGRAM   CMAQ $21,500,000 $6,500,000 $5,200,000 $1,300,000
2026 S12807 Boston Region Multiple MWRTA CATCHCONNECT MICROTRANSIT EXPANSION PHASE 2 3 CMAQ $380,477 $107,977 $86,382 $21,595
Transit Grant Program $2,392,023 $1,913,618 $478,405
2026 S12124 Boston Region Multiple COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS PROGRAM   CMAQ $8,334,827 $2,392,023 $1,913,618 $478,405
Section 1B / Earmark or Discretionary Grant Funded Projects $206,088,967 $165,499,525 $40,589,442
Earmark Discretionary $0 $0 $0
2026 607977 Boston Region Multiple HOPKINTON- WESTBOROUGH- RECONSTRUCTION OF I-90/I-495 INTERCHANGE 3 HIP $300,942,837 $0 $0 $0
Bridge On-system Non-NHS NB $6,947,208 $5,557,766 $1,389,442
2026 612075 Boston Region Salem SALEM- BRIDGE REPLACEMENT, S-01-024, JEFFERSON AVENUE OVER PARALLEL STREET 4 HIP-BR $3,123,360 $3,123,360 $2,498,688 $624,672
2026 612099 Boston Region   ASHLAND- BRIDGE REPLACEMENT, A-14-006, CORDAVILLE ROAD OVER SUDBURY RIVER 3 HIP-BR $3,823,848 $3,823,848 $3,059,078 $764,770
Bridge Off-system Local NB $3,141,758 $3,141,758 $0
2026 612076 Boston Region Topsfield TOPSFIELD- BRIDGE REPLACEMENT, T-06-013, PERKINS ROW OVER MILE BROOK 4 BROFF $3,141,758 $3,141,758 $3,141,758 $0
Bridge On-System NHS NB $196,000,001 $156,800,001 $39,200,000
2026 612496 Boston Region Somerville SOMERVILLE- BRIDGE PRESERVATION, S-17-031, I-93 (NB & SB) FROM ROUTE 28 TO TEMPLE STREET (PHASE 2) 4 HIP-BR $196,000,001 $196,000,001 $156,800,001 $39,200,000
Section 2A / State Prioritized Reliability Projects $72,552,107 $61,441,667 $11,110,441
Bridge On-system NHS $17,824,268 $14,259,414 $3,564,854
2026 605321 Boston Region Norwood NORWOOD- BRIDGE PRESERVATION, N-25-026, PROVIDENCE HIGHWAY (STATE ROUTE 1) OVER THE NEPONSET RIVER 5 NHPP-PEN $3,460,268 $3,460,268 $2,768,214 $692,054
2026 606449 Boston Region Cambridge CAMBRIDGE- BRIDGE REPLACEMENT, C-01-008, FIRST STREET BRIDGE & C-01-040, LAND BOULEVARD/BROAD CANAL BRIDGE 6 NHPP-PEN $14,364,000 $14,364,000 $11,491,200 $2,872,800
Safety Improvements $21,175,209 $18,725,548 $2,449,661
2026 610675 Boston Region Chelsea CHELSEA- RECONSTRUCTION OF SPRUCE STREET, FROM EVERETT AVENUE TO WILLIAMS STREET 6 HSIP $5,841,153 $5,841,153 $5,257,038 $584,115
2026 611954 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- GUIDE AND TRAFFIC SIGN REPLACEMENT ON I-90/I-93 WITHIN CENTRAL ARTERY/TUNNEL SYSTEM 6 HSIP $2,423,736 $2,423,736 $2,181,362 $242,374
2026 611974 Boston Region Medford MEDFORD- INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENTS AT MAIN STREET/SOUTH STREET, MAIN STREET/MYSTIC VALLEY PARKWAY RAMPS, AND MAIN STREET/MYSTIC AVENUE 4 HSIP $9,177,840 $4,588,920 $4,130,028 $458,892
2026 612599 Boston Region Lynn LYNN- TARGETED SAFETY AND MULTIMODAL IMPROVEMENTS (PLAYBOOK PRIORITY CORRIDORS) 4 HSIP $8,321,400 $5,000,000 $4,500,000 $500,000
2026 612599 Boston Region Lynn LYNN- TARGETED SAFETY AND MULTIMODAL IMPROVEMENTS (PLAYBOOK PRIORITY CORRIDORS) 4 STBG $8,321,400 $3,321,400 $2,657,120 $664,280
Non-Interstate Pavement $17,406,630 $13,925,304 $3,481,326
2026 612049 Boston Region Randolph RANDOLPH- RESURFACING AND RELATED WORK ON ROUTE 24 6 NHPP $9,128,700 $9,128,700 $7,302,960 $1,825,740
2026 612050 Boston Region Multiple BRAINTREE- WEYMOUTH- RESURFACING AND RELATED WORK ON ROUTE 3 6 NHPP $8,277,930 $8,277,930 $6,622,344 $1,655,586
Interstate Pavement $16,146,000 $14,531,400 $1,614,600
2026 612051 Boston Region Multiple CANTON- MILTON- RANDOLPH- INTERSTATE MAINTENANCE AND RELATED WORK ON I-93 6 NHPP-I $16,146,000 $16,146,000 $14,531,400 $1,614,600
Section 2B / State Prioritized Modernization Projects $70,560,716 $62,531,022 $8,029,694
Roadway Reconstruction $48,088,307 $43,279,476 $4,808,831
2026 607977 Boston Region Multiple HOPKINTON- WESTBOROUGH- RECONSTRUCTION OF I-90/I-495 INTERCHANGE 3 NHPP-I $300,942,837 $41,613,593 $37,452,234 $4,161,359
2026 607977 Boston Region Multiple HOPKINTON- WESTBOROUGH- RECONSTRUCTION OF I-90/I-495 INTERCHANGE 3 NFP-I $300,942,837 $6,474,714 $5,827,243 $647,471
Intersection Improvements $12,736,182 $11,462,564 $1,273,618
2026 608564 Boston Region Watertown WATERTOWN- INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENTS AT ROUTE 16 AND GALEN STREET 6 HSIP $3,449,261 $3,449,261 $3,104,335 $344,926
2026 610665 Boston Region Stoneham STONEHAM- INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENTS AT ROUTE 28 (MAIN STREET), NORTH BORDER ROAD AND SOUTH STREET 4 HSIP $4,698,001 $4,698,001 $4,228,201 $469,800
2026 611974 Boston Region Medford MEDFORD- INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENTS AT MAIN STREET/SOUTH STREET, MAIN STREET/MYSTIC VALLEY PARKWAY RAMPS, AND MAIN STREET/MYSTIC AVENUE 4 HSIP $9,177,840 $4,588,920 $4,130,028 $458,892
Safe Routes to School $9,736,227 $7,788,982 $1,947,245
2026 610537 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- ELLIS ELEMENTARY TRAFFIC CALMING (SRTS) 6 TAP $2,737,728 $2,737,728 $2,190,182 $547,546
2026 612804 Boston Region Dedham DEDHAM- IMPROVEMENTS AT AVERY ELEMENTARY (SRTS) 6 TAP $1,626,334 $1,626,334 $1,301,067 $325,267
2026 612816 Boston Region Brookline BROOKLINE- IMPROVEMENTS AT WILLIAM H. LINCOLN SCHOOL (SRTS) 6 TAP $886,526 $886,526 $709,221 $177,305
2026 612884 Boston Region Chelsea CHELSEA- IMPROVEMENTS AT MARY C. BURKE ELEMENTARY (SRTS) 6 TAP $1,617,667 $1,617,667 $1,294,134 $323,533
2026 612889 Boston Region Sharon SHARON- COTTAGE STREET SCHOOL IMPROVEMENTS (SRTS) 5 TAP $1,497,906 $1,497,906 $1,198,325 $299,581
2026 612894 Boston Region Framingham FRAMINGHAM- IMPROVEMENTS AT HARMONY GROVE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (SRTS) 3 TAP $1,370,066 $1,370,066 $1,096,053 $274,013
Section 2C / State Prioritized Expansion Projects $5,417,093 $4,333,674 $1,083,419
Bicycle and Pedestrian $5,417,093 $4,333,674 $1,083,419
2026 612523 Boston Region Revere REVERE- STATE ROAD BEACHMONT CONNECTOR 4 CMAQ $5,417,093 $5,417,093 $4,333,674 $1,083,419
Section 3B / Non-Federal Aid Funded $26,680,000 $0 $26,680,000
NFA $26,680,000 $0 $26,680,000
2026 607977 Boston Region Multiple HOPKINTON- WESTBOROUGH- RECONSTRUCTION OF I-90/I-495 INTERCHANGE 3 NFA $300,942,837 $26,680,000 $0 $26,680,000
STIP: 2024 - 2028 (D)
Year MassDOT Project ID MPO Municipality MassDOT Project Description District Funding Source Adjusted TFPC Total Programmed Funds Federal Funds Non-Federal Funds
Federal Fiscal Year 2027 $622,136,812 $282,978,807 $339,158,005
Section 1A / Regionally Prioritized Projects $144,006,044 $116,629,527 $27,376,517
Roadway Reconstruction $94,327,597 $76,362,078 $17,965,519
2027 605743 Boston Region Ipswich IPSWICH- RESURFACING & RELATED WORK ON CENTRAL & SOUTH MAIN STREETS 4 STBG $11,728,698 $6,026,622 $4,821,298 $1,205,324
2027 606226 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- RECONSTRUCTION OF RUTHERFORD AVENUE, FROM CITY SQUARE TO SULLIVAN SQUARE 6 NHPP $197,759,449 $8,600,000 $6,880,000 $1,720,000
2027 606226 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- RECONSTRUCTION OF RUTHERFORD AVENUE, FROM CITY SQUARE TO SULLIVAN SQUARE 6 STBG $197,759,449 $0 $0 $0
2027 606226 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- RECONSTRUCTION OF RUTHERFORD AVENUE, FROM CITY SQUARE TO SULLIVAN SQUARE 6 TAP $197,759,449 $0 $0 $0
2027 607981 Boston Region Somerville SOMERVILLE- MCGRATH BOULEVARD CONSTRUCTION 4 STBG $98,840,000 $20,000,000 $16,000,000 $4,000,000
2027 607981 Boston Region Somerville SOMERVILLE- MCGRATH BOULEVARD CONSTRUCTION 4 TAP $98,840,000 $2,000,000 $1,600,000 $400,000
2027 609246 Boston Region Lynn LYNN- REHABILITATION OF WESTERN AVENUE (ROUTE 107) 4 HSIP $45,897,600 $3,000,000 $2,700,000 $300,000
2027 609246 Boston Region Lynn LYNN- REHABILITATION OF WESTERN AVENUE (ROUTE 107) 4 STBG $45,897,600 $12,000,000 $9,600,000 $2,400,000
2027 610932 Boston Region Brookline BROOKLINE- REHABILITATION OF WASHINGTON STREET 6 HSIP $28,995,267 $5,000,000 $4,500,000 $500,000
2027 610932 Boston Region Brookline BROOKLINE- REHABILITATION OF WASHINGTON STREET 6 STBG $28,995,267 $23,995,267 $19,196,214 $4,799,053
2027 611983 Boston Region Chelsea CHELSEA- PARK STREET & PEARL STREET RECONSTRUCTION 6 HSIP $11,705,708 $1,000,000 $900,000 $100,000
2027 611983 Boston Region Chelsea CHELSEA- PARK STREET & PEARL STREET RECONSTRUCTION 6 STBG $11,705,708 $10,705,708 $8,564,566 $2,141,142
2027 S12820 Boston Region   BIKESHARE SUPPORT SET ASIDE   STBG $6,000,000 $2,000,000 $1,600,000 $400,000
Intersection Improvements $17,573,400 $14,058,720 $3,514,680
2027 605857 Boston Region Norwood NORWOOD- INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENTS @ ROUTE 1 & UNIVERSITY AVENUE/EVERETT STREET  5 CMAQ $28,699,272 $3,000,000 $2,400,000 $600,000
2027 605857 Boston Region Norwood NORWOOD- INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENTS @ ROUTE 1 & UNIVERSITY AVENUE/EVERETT STREET  5 NHPP $28,699,272 $3,573,400 $2,858,720 $714,680
2027 605857 Boston Region Norwood NORWOOD- INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENTS @ ROUTE 1 & UNIVERSITY AVENUE/EVERETT STREET  5 STBG $28,699,272 $11,000,000 $8,800,000 $2,200,000
Roadway Improvements $13,000,000 $10,400,000 $2,600,000
2027 607981 Boston Region Somerville SOMERVILLE- MCGRATH BOULEVARD CONSTRUCTION 4 NHPP $98,840,000 $13,000,000 $10,400,000 $2,600,000
Bicycle and Pedestrian $4,858,127 $3,886,502 $971,625
2027 613088 Boston Region Malden MALDEN- SPOT POND BROOK GREENWAY 4 CMAQ $4,858,127 $3,000,000 $2,400,000 $600,000
2027 613088 Boston Region Malden MALDEN- SPOT POND BROOK GREENWAY 4 TAP $4,858,127 $1,858,127 $1,486,502 $371,625
Safety Improvements $5,246,920 $4,722,228 $524,692
2027 613121 Boston Region Everett EVERETT- TARGETED MULTI-MODAL AND SAFETY IMPROVEMENTS ON ROUTE 16 (DESIGN ONLY) 4 HSIP $5,246,920 $5,246,920 $4,722,228 $524,692
Flex to FTA $6,500,000 $5,200,000 $1,300,000
2027 S12113 Boston Region   TRANSIT MODERNIZATION PROGRAM   CMAQ $21,500,000 $6,500,000 $5,200,000 $1,300,000
Transit Grant Program $2,500,000 $2,000,000 $500,000
2027 S12124 Boston Region Multiple COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS PROGRAM   CMAQ $8,334,827 $2,500,000 $2,000,000 $500,000
Section 2A / State Prioritized Reliability Projects $241,511,844 $82,877,514 $158,634,330
Bridge On-system Non-NHS $138,719,952 $0 $138,719,952
2027 605276 Boston Region Multiple BEVERLY- SALEM- DRAWBRIDGE REPLACEMENT/REHABILITATION OF B-11-005=S-01-013, KERNWOOD AVENUE OVER DANVERS RIVER 4 NGBP $92,094,352 $92,094,352 $0 $92,094,352
2027 607420 Boston Region Natick NATICK- SUPERSTRUCTURE REPLACEMENT, N-03-012, BODEN LANE OVER CSX/MBTA 3 NGBP $7,985,600 $7,985,600 $0 $7,985,600
2027 608514 Boston Region Beverly BEVERLY- BRIDGE REPLACEMENT, B-11-001, BRIDGE STREET OVER BASS RIVER (HALL-WHITAKER DRAWBRIDGE) 4 NGBP $38,640,000 $38,640,000 $0 $38,640,000
Bridge On-system NHS $96,351,892 $77,081,514 $19,270,378
2027 606728 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- BRIDGE REPLACEMENT B-16-365, STORROW DRIVE OVER BOWKER RAMPS 6 NHPP-PEN $112,056,000 $10,477,205 $8,381,764 $2,095,441
2027 611987 Boston Region Cambridge CAMBRIDGE- BRIDGE REPLACEMENT, C-01-026, MEMORIAL DRIVE OVER BROOKLINE STREET 6 NHPP $51,108,646 $51,108,646 $40,886,917 $10,221,729
2027 612519 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- BRIDGE REPLACEMENT, B-16-165, BLUE HILL AVENUE OVER RAILROAD 6 NHPP-PEN $34,766,041 $34,766,041 $27,812,833 $6,953,208
Non-Interstate Pavement $0 $0 $0
2027 609402 Boston Region Multiple FRAMINGHAM- NATICK- RESURFACING AND RELATED WORK ON ROUTE 9 3 NHPP $48,665,364 $0 $0 $0
Safety Improvements $6,440,000 $5,796,000 $644,000
2027 610650 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- SAFETY IMPROVEMENTS ON GALLIVAN BOULEVARD (ROUTE 203), FROM WASHINGTON STREET TO GRANITE AVENUE 6 HSIP $6,440,000 $6,440,000 $5,796,000 $644,000
2027 612599 Boston Region Lynn LYNN- TARGETED SAFETY AND MULTIMODAL IMPROVEMENTS (PLAYBOOK PRIORITY CORRIDORS) 4 HSIP $8,321,400 $0 $0 $0
2027 612599 Boston Region Lynn LYNN- TARGETED SAFETY AND MULTIMODAL IMPROVEMENTS (PLAYBOOK PRIORITY CORRIDORS) 4 STBG $8,321,400 $0 $0 $0
Interstate Pavement $0 $0 $0
2027 612033 Boston Region Lynnfield LYNNFIELD- PEABODY- INTERSTATE MAINTENANCE AND RELATED WORK ON I-95 4 NHPP-I $8,575,451 $0 $0 $0
Section 2B / State Prioritized Modernization Projects $75,333,816 $65,419,642 $9,914,175
Roadway Reconstruction $63,007,343 $54,763,028 $8,244,315
2027 607977 Boston Region Multiple HOPKINTON- WESTBOROUGH- RECONSTRUCTION OF I-90/I-495 INTERCHANGE 3 NHPP-I $300,942,837 $17,928,463 $16,135,617 $1,792,846
2027 607977 Boston Region Multiple HOPKINTON- WESTBOROUGH- RECONSTRUCTION OF I-90/I-495 INTERCHANGE 3 NFP-I $300,942,837 $25,643,072 $23,078,765 $2,564,307
2027 612615 Boston Region Multiple CANTON- MILTON- ROADWAY RECONSTRUCTION ON ROUTE 138, FROM ROYALL STREET TO DOLLAR LANE 6 NHPP $19,435,808 $19,435,808 $15,548,646 $3,887,162
Intersection Improvements $7,954,352 $7,158,917 $795,435
2027 612613 Boston Region Newton NEWTON- INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENTS AT ROUTE 16 AND QUINOBEQUIN ROAD 6 HSIP $4,872,000 $4,872,000 $4,384,800 $487,200
2027 612616 Boston Region Milton MILTON- INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENTS AT ROUTE 138 AND BRADLEE ROAD 6 HSIP $3,082,352 $3,082,352 $2,774,117 $308,235
Safe Routes to School $4,372,121 $3,497,697 $874,424
2027 S12793 Boston Region   Holliston-Linden Street   TAP $617,187 $617,187 $493,750 $123,437
2027 S12795 Boston Region   Newton-Parker   TAP $1,456,000 $1,456,000 $1,164,800 $291,200
2027 S12796 Boston Region   Reading-Oakland Rd / Hillside Rd / Birch Meadow Drive-Coolidge Middle School   TAP $2,298,934 $2,298,934 $1,839,147 $459,787
Section 2C / State Prioritized Expansion Projects $22,565,156 $18,052,125 $4,513,031
Bicycle and Pedestrian $22,565,156 $18,052,125 $4,513,031
2027 607329 Boston Region Multiple WAKEFIELD- LYNNFIELD- RAIL TRAIL EXTENSION, FROM THE GALVIN MIDDLE SCHOOL TO LYNNFIELD/PEABODY T.L. 4 CMAQ $24,543,047 $10,600,000 $8,480,000 $2,120,000
2027 610660 Boston Region Multiple SUDBURY- WAYLAND- MASS CENTRAL RAIL TRAIL (MCRT) 3 CMAQ $4,061,413 $4,061,413 $3,249,130 $812,283
2027 612499 Boston Region Medford MEDFORD- SOUTH MEDFORD CONNECTOR BIKE PATH 4 CMAQ $7,903,743 $7,903,743 $6,322,994 $1,580,749
Section 3B / Non-Federal Aid Funded $138,719,952 $0 $138,719,952
Bridge On-system Non-NHS $138,719,952 $0 $138,719,952
2027 605276 Boston Region Multiple BEVERLY- SALEM- DRAWBRIDGE REPLACEMENT/REHABILITATION OF B-11-005=S-01-013, KERNWOOD AVENUE OVER DANVERS RIVER 4 NGBP $92,094,352 $92,094,352 $0 $92,094,352
2027 607420 Boston Region Natick NATICK- SUPERSTRUCTURE REPLACEMENT, N-03-012, BODEN LANE OVER CSX/MBTA 3 NGBP $7,985,600 $7,985,600 $0 $7,985,600
2027 608514 Boston Region Beverly BEVERLY- BRIDGE REPLACEMENT, B-11-001, BRIDGE STREET OVER BASS RIVER (HALL-WHITAKER DRAWBRIDGE) 4 NGBP $38,640,000 $38,640,000 $0 $38,640,000
STIP: 2024 - 2028 (D)
Year MassDOT Project ID MPO Municipality MassDOT Project Description District Funding Source Adjusted TFPC Total Programmed Funds Federal Funds Non-Federal Funds
Federal Fiscal Year 2028 $500,800,259 $403,559,552 $97,240,707
Section 1A / Regionally Prioritized Projects $149,868,526 $120,394,821 $29,473,705
Roadway Reconstruction $124,176,075 $99,840,860 $24,335,215
2028 606226 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- RECONSTRUCTION OF RUTHERFORD AVENUE, FROM CITY SQUARE TO SULLIVAN SQUARE 6 NHPP $197,759,449 $12,000,000 $9,600,000 $2,400,000
2028 606226 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- RECONSTRUCTION OF RUTHERFORD AVENUE, FROM CITY SQUARE TO SULLIVAN SQUARE 6 STBG $197,759,449 $19,500,000 $15,600,000 $3,900,000
2028 606226 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- RECONSTRUCTION OF RUTHERFORD AVENUE, FROM CITY SQUARE TO SULLIVAN SQUARE 6 TAP $197,759,449 $2,000,000 $1,600,000 $400,000
2028 607981 Boston Region Somerville SOMERVILLE- MCGRATH BOULEVARD CONSTRUCTION 4 STBG $98,840,000 $30,000,000 $24,000,000 $6,000,000
2028 609246 Boston Region Lynn LYNN- REHABILITATION OF WESTERN AVENUE (ROUTE 107) 4 HSIP $45,897,600 $5,000,000 $4,500,000 $500,000
2028 609246 Boston Region Lynn LYNN- REHABILITATION OF WESTERN AVENUE (ROUTE 107) 4 STBG $45,897,600 $15,000,000 $12,000,000 $3,000,000
2028 S12820 Boston Region   BIKESHARE SUPPORT SET ASIDE   STBG $6,000,000 $2,000,000 $1,600,000 $400,000
2028 S12826 Boston Region Multiple WESTWOOD- NORWOOD- RECONSTRUCTION OF CANTON STREET TO UNIVERSITY DRIVE, INCLUDING REHAB OF N-25-032=W-31-018 6 CMAQ $22,094,875 $4,000,000 $3,200,000 $800,000
2028 S12826 Boston Region Multiple WESTWOOD- NORWOOD- RECONSTRUCTION OF CANTON STREET TO UNIVERSITY DRIVE, INCLUDING REHAB OF N-25-032=W-31-018 6 STBG $22,094,875 $18,094,875 $14,475,900 $3,618,975
2028 S12827 Boston Region Wakefield WAKEFIELD - MAIN STREET CORRIDOR IMPROVEMENT PROJECT 4 CMAQ $16,581,200 $8,000,000 $6,400,000 $1,600,000
2028 S12827 Boston Region Wakefield WAKEFIELD - MAIN STREET CORRIDOR IMPROVEMENT PROJECT 4 STBG $16,581,200 $7,081,200 $5,664,960 $1,416,240
2028 S12827 Boston Region Wakefield WAKEFIELD - MAIN STREET CORRIDOR IMPROVEMENT PROJECT 4 TAP $16,581,200 $1,500,000 $1,200,000 $300,000
Bicycle and Pedestrian $16,692,451 $13,353,961 $3,338,490
2028 610666 Boston Region Swampscott SWAMPSCOTT- RAIL TRAIL CONSTRUCTION 4 CMAQ $8,932,000 $7,300,000 $5,840,000 $1,460,000
2028 610666 Boston Region Swampscott SWAMPSCOTT- RAIL TRAIL CONSTRUCTION 4 TAP $8,932,000 $1,632,000 $1,305,600 $326,400
2028 610691 Boston Region Natick NATICK- COCHITUATE RAIL TRAIL EXTENSION, FROM MBTA STATION TO MECHANIC STREET 3 STBG $7,760,451 $7,760,451 $6,208,361 $1,552,090
Flex to FTA $6,500,000 $5,200,000 $1,300,000
2028 S12113 Boston Region   TRANSIT MODERNIZATION PROGRAM   CMAQ $21,500,000 $6,500,000 $5,200,000 $1,300,000
Transit Grant Program $2,500,000 $2,000,000 $500,000
2028 S12124 Boston Region Multiple COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS PROGRAM   CMAQ $8,334,827 $2,500,000 $2,000,000 $500,000
Section 1B / Earmark or Discretionary Grant Funded Projects $64,960,000 $51,968,000 $12,992,000
Bridge On-system Non-NHS NB $64,960,000 $51,968,000 $12,992,000
2028 608397 Boston Region Gloucester GLOUCESTER- BRIDGE RECONSTRUCTION, G-05-002, WESTERN AVENUE OVER BLYNMAN CANAL 4 HIP-BR $64,960,000 $64,960,000 $51,968,000 $12,992,000
Section 2A / State Prioritized Reliability Projects $234,431,079 $189,640,644 $44,790,435
Bridge On-system NHS $152,275,425 $121,820,340 $30,455,085
2028 606728 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- BRIDGE REPLACEMENT B-16-365, STORROW DRIVE OVER BOWKER RAMPS 6 NHPP-PEN $112,056,000 $40,075,975 $32,060,780 $8,015,195
2028 608396 Boston Region Multiple LYNN- REVERE- BRIDGE RECONSTRUCTION, L-18-015=R-05-008, ROUTE 1A OVER SAUGUS RIVER 4 NHPP $105,560,000 $54,185,724 $43,348,579 $10,837,145
2028 613124 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- DECK/SUPERSTRUCTURE REPLACEMENT, B-16-054 (4T2), BEACON STREET OVER I-90 (STRUCTURE 50, MILE 132.2) 6 NHPP-PEN $42,295,604 $42,295,604 $33,836,483 $8,459,121
2028 613125 Boston Region Boston BOSTON- DECK/SUPERSTRUCTURE REPLACEMENT OF BRIDGE B-16-051(4T5), MASS AVENUE OVER I-90 & MBTA (STRUCTURE 54, MILE 132.84)  6 NHPP-PEN $15,718,122 $15,718,122 $12,574,498 $3,143,624
Safety Improvements $16,183,809 $13,312,180 $2,871,629
2028 607748 Boston Region Acton ACTON- INTERSECTION & SIGNAL IMPROVEMENTS ON SR 2 & SR 111 (MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE) AT PIPER ROAD & TAYLOR ROAD 3 HSIP $4,382,329 $3,651,329 $3,286,196 $365,133
2028 611969 Boston Region Everett EVERETT- INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENTS ON ROUTE 16 4 NHPP $17,748,000 $12,532,480 $10,025,984 $2,506,496
Non-Interstate Pavement $48,665,364 $38,932,291 $9,733,073
2028 609402 Boston Region Multiple FRAMINGHAM- NATICK- RESURFACING AND RELATED WORK ON ROUTE 9 3 NHPP $48,665,364 $48,665,364 $38,932,291 $9,733,073
Interstate Pavement $17,306,481 $15,575,833 $1,730,648
2028 612033 Boston Region Lynnfield LYNNFIELD- PEABODY- INTERSTATE MAINTENANCE AND RELATED WORK ON I-95 4 NHPP-I $8,575,451 $8,575,451 $7,717,906 $857,545
2028 612094 Boston Region Multiple CANTON- DEDHAM- WESTWOOD- INTERSTATE MAINTENANCE AND RELATED WORK ON I-95 6 NHPP-I $8,731,030 $8,731,030 $7,857,927 $873,103
Section 2B / State Prioritized Modernization Projects $34,191,557 $27,676,809 $6,514,748
Intersection Improvements $2,458,573 $2,212,716 $245,857
2028 607748 Boston Region Acton ACTON- INTERSECTION & SIGNAL IMPROVEMENTS ON SR 2 & SR 111 (MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE) AT PIPER ROAD & TAYLOR ROAD 3 HSIP $4,382,329 $731,000 $657,900 $73,100
2028 608052 Boston Region Norwood NORWOOD- INTERSECTION & SIGNAL IMPROVEMENTS AT US 1 (PROVIDENCE HIGHWAY) & MORSE STREET 5 HSIP $1,727,573 $1,727,573 $1,554,816 $172,757
Roadway Reconstruction $31,732,984 $25,464,094 $6,268,890
2028 607977 Boston Region Multiple HOPKINTON- WESTBOROUGH- RECONSTRUCTION OF I-90/I-495 INTERCHANGE 3 NHPP-I $300,942,837 $777,064 $699,358 $77,706
2028 609527 Boston Region Reading READING- IMPROVEMENTS ON I-95 4 NHPP $17,376,800 $17,376,800 $13,901,440 $3,475,360
2028 610543 Boston Region Multiple REVERE- MALDEN- IMPROVEMENTS AT ROUTE 1 (NB) (PHASE 1) 4 NHPP $8,363,600 $8,363,600 $6,690,880 $1,672,720
2028 611969 Boston Region Everett EVERETT- INTERSECTION IMPROVEMENTS ON ROUTE 16 4 NHPP $17,748,000 $5,215,520 $4,172,416 $1,043,104
Section 2C / State Prioritized Expansion Projects $17,349,097 $13,879,278 $3,469,819
Bicycle and Pedestrian $17,349,097 $13,879,278 $3,469,819
2028 607329 Boston Region Multiple WAKEFIELD- LYNNFIELD- RAIL TRAIL EXTENSION, FROM THE GALVIN MIDDLE SCHOOL TO LYNNFIELD/PEABODY T.L. 4 CMAQ $24,543,047 $13,943,047 $11,154,438 $2,788,609
2028 612607 Boston Region Danvers DANVERS- RAIL TRAIL WEST EXTENSION (PHASE 3) 4 CMAQ $3,406,050 $3,406,050 $2,724,840 $681,210

 

 

Table 3-8
FFYs 2024-28 TIP Transit Table (MBTA Federal Capital Program)

Federal Funding Program ALI 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 FFY24-28 Total (Federal) FFY24-28 Total (Incl. Match)
       
5307   $193,628,164 $197,611,190 $202,682,910 $202,682,910 $202,682,910 $999,288,084 $1,249,110,105
Bridge & Tunnel Program   12.24.05 $0 $26,234,709 $26,234,709 $26,234,709 $26,234,709 $104,938,836 $131,173,545
Revenue Vehicle Program  12.12.00 $59,283,688 $101,373,367 $106,445,087 $106,445,087 $106,445,087 $479,992,316 $599,990,395
Signals/Systems Upgrade Program  12.63.01 $78,024,477 $38,176,646 $38,176,646 $38,176,646 $38,176,646 $230,731,061 $288,413,826
Stations and Facilities Program  12.34.00 $56,319,999 $31,826,468 $31,826,468 $31,826,468 $31,826,468 $183,625,871 $229,532,339
       
5337   $232,546,158 $236,571,519 $241,684,814 $241,684,814 $241,684,814 $1,194,172,119 $1,492,715,149
Bridge & Tunnel Program   12.24.05 $41,922,735 $85,641,776 $85,641,776 $85,641,776 $85,641,776 $384,489,839 $480,612,299
Revenue Vehicle Program  12.12.00 $39,200,000 $26,782,526 $31,895,822 $31,895,822 $31,895,822 $161,669,992 $202,087,490
Signals/Systems Upgrade Program  12.63.01 $32,306,280 $25,811,048 $25,811,047 $25,811,047 $25,811,047 $135,550,469 $169,438,086
Stations and Facilities Program  12.34.00 $119,117,143 $98,336,169 $98,336,169 $98,336,169 $98,336,169 $512,461,819 $640,577,274
       
5339   $6,135,804 $6,261,816 $6,416,908 $6,416,908 $6,416,908 $31,648,344 $39,560,430
Bus Program  11.14.00 $6,135,804 $6,261,816 $6,416,908 $6,416,908 $6,416,908 $31,648,344 $39,560,430
                 
FFY24-28 FTA Formula Funding   $432,310,126 $440,444,525 $450,784,632 $450,784,632 $450,784,632 $2,225,108,547 $2,781,385,684
                 
Other Federal   $147,500,000 $516,564,667 $247,585,333 $147,500,000 $147,500,000 $1,206,650,000 $1,206,650,000
RRIF Financing - PTC/ATC/Fiber 12.63.01 $0 $369,064,667 $100,085,333 $0 $0 $469,150,000 $469,150,000
RRIF/TIFIA Financing Program 12.24.05 $147,500,000 $147,500,000 $147,500,000 $147,500,000 $147,500,000 $737,500,000 $737,500,000
       
FFY24-28 Total Federal Funding   $579,810,126 $957,009,192 $698,369,965 $598,284,632 $598,284,632 $3,431,758,547 $3,988,035,684
Note:
FTA formula funds (5307, 5337 and 5339) are based on estimated apportionments for FFY24-28.  
TIP programs and projects are based on the draft FY24-28 CIP and planned federal obligations as of Apr-23.  Adjustments will be made to federal projects and budgets as the FY24-28 CIP is finalized. 
The Activity Line Item (ALI) codes are preliminary only and generally reflect the bulk of the TIP program. Within a program there may be several different ALI codes used. 
RRIF loan funding for the PTC/ATC/Fiber Resiliency project is based on the currently planned drawdown schedule and is subject to change.
RRIF/TIFIA financing program funding is an initial estimate and will be refined as projects are identified and loans are finalized with the Build America Bureau.

 

 

Table 3-9
FFYs 2024-28 TIP Transit Table (MBTA Federal Capital Program - Project List and Descriptions [80% Federal Share])

STIP: 2024 - 2028 (D)
Year MassDOT Project ID Program MassDOT Project Description Funding Source Total Project Cost Total Programmed Funds Federal Funds Other Funds
Federal Fiscal Year 2024 $740,987,658 $622,290,126 $118,697,532
Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority $740,987,658 $622,290,126 $118,697,532
2024 MBTA011468 Bus Program Columbus Ave. Bus Lane Ph. II (CMAQ) LF $11,750,000 $2,350,000   $2,350,000
2024 MBTA011468 Bus Program Columbus Ave. Bus Lane Ph. II (CMAQ) OF $11,750,000 $9,400,000 $9,400,000  
2024 MBTA011470 Stations and Facilities Program (MBTA) Jackson Sq. Station Access Impr. (CMAQ) LF $13,750,000 $2,750,000   $2,750,000
2024 MBTA011470 Stations and Facilities Program (MBTA) Jackson Sq. Station Access Impr. (CMAQ) OF $13,750,000 $11,000,000 $11,000,000  
2024 MBTA011472 Stations and Facilities Program (MBTA) Rail Transformation - Early Action CMAQ) LF $14,000,000 $2,800,000   $2,800,000
2024 MBTA011472 Stations and Facilities Program (MBTA) Rail Transformation - Early Action CMAQ) OF $14,000,000 $11,200,000 $11,200,000  
2024 MBTA015 Revenue Vehicle Program 5307 Revenue Vehicle Program  5307 $74,104,610 $59,283,688 $59,283,688  
2024 MBTA015 Revenue Vehicle Program 5307 Revenue Vehicle Program  LF $74,104,610 $14,820,922   $14,820,922
2024 MBTA016 Signals/Systems Upgrade Program  5307 Signals/Systems Upgrade Program  5307 $97,530,596 $78,024,477 $78,024,477  
2024 MBTA016 Signals/Systems Upgrade Program  5307 Signals/Systems Upgrade Program  LF $97,530,596 $19,506,119   $19,506,119
2024 MBTA017 Stations and Facilities Program (MBTA) 5307 Stations and Facilities Program  5307 $70,399,999 $56,319,999 $56,319,999  
2024 MBTA017 Stations and Facilities Program (MBTA) 5307 Stations and Facilities Program  LF $70,399,999 $14,080,000   $14,080,000
2024 MBTA018 Bridge & Tunnel Program 5337 Bridge & Tunnel Program  5337 $52,403,419 $41,922,735 $41,922,735  
2024 MBTA018 Bridge & Tunnel Program 5337 Bridge & Tunnel Program  LF $52,403,419 $10,480,684   $10,480,684
2024 MBTA019 Revenue Vehicle Program 5337 Revenue Vehicle Program 5337 $49,000,000 $39,200,000 $39,200,000  
2024 MBTA019 Revenue Vehicle Program 5337 Revenue Vehicle Program LF $49,000,000 $9,800,000   $9,800,000
2024 MBTA020 Signals/Systems Upgrade Program  5337 Signals/Systems Upgrade Program 5337 $40,382,850 $32,306,280 $32,306,280  
2024 MBTA020 Signals/Systems Upgrade Program  5337 Signals/Systems Upgrade Program LF $40,382,850 $8,076,570   $8,076,570
2024 MBTA021 Stations and Facilities Program (MBTA) 5337 Stations and Facilities Program 5337 $114,790,805 $119,117,143 $119,117,143  
2024 MBTA021 Stations and Facilities Program (MBTA) 5337 Stations and Facilities Program LF $114,790,805 $29,779,286   $29,779,286
2024 MBTA022 Bus Program 5339 Bus Program 5339 $7,669,755 $6,135,804 $6,135,804  
2024 MBTA022 Bus Program 5339 Bus Program LF $7,669,755 $1,533,951   $1,533,951
2024 MBTA024 RRIF/TIFIA Financing Program RRIF/TIFIA Financing Program OF $147,500,000 $147,500,000 $147,500,000  
2024 MBTA025 Lynn Station Improvements Lynn Station Improvements LF $13,600,000 $2,720,000   $2,720,000
2024 MBTA025 Lynn Station Improvements Lynn Station Improvements OF $13,600,000 $10,880,000 $10,880,000  
STIP: 2024 - 2028 (D)
Year MassDOT Project ID Program MassDOT Project Description Funding Source Total Project Cost Total Programmed Funds Federal Funds Other Funds
Federal Fiscal Year 2025 $1,079,620,324 $967,009,192 $112,611,132
Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority $1,079,620,324 $967,009,192 $112,611,132
2025 MBTA011474 Signals/Systems Upgrade Program  Jackson Sq. Station Access Impr. (CMAQ) LF $12,500,000 $2,500,000   $2,500,000
2025 MBTA011474 Stations and Facilities Program (MBTA) Jackson Sq. Station Access Impr. (CMAQ) OF $12,500,000 $10,000,000 $10,000,000  
2025 MBTA027 Bridge & Tunnel Program 5307 Bridge & Tunnel Program 5307 $32,793,386 $26,234,709 $26,234,709  
2025 MBTA027 Bridge & Tunnel Program 5307 Bridge & Tunnel Program LF $32,793,386 $6,558,677   $6,558,677
2025 MBTA028 Revenue Vehicle Program 5307 Revenue Vehicle Program 5307 $126,716,709 $101,373,367 $101,373,367  
2025 MBTA028 Revenue Vehicle Program 5307 Revenue Vehicle Program LF $126,716,709 $25,343,342   $25,343,342
2025 MBTA029 Signals/Systems Upgrade Program  5307 Signals/Systems Upgrade Program 5307 $47,720,808 $38,176,646 $38,176,646  
2025 MBTA029 Signals/Systems Upgrade Program  5307 Signals/Systems Upgrade Program LF $47,720,808 $9,544,162   $9,544,162
2025 MBTA030 Stations and Facilities Program (MBTA) 5307 Stations and Facilities Program 5307 $39,783,085 $31,826,468 $31,826,468  
2025 MBTA030 Stations and Facilities Program (MBTA) 5307 Stations and Facilities Program LF $39,783,085 $7,956,617   $7,956,617
2025 MBTA031 Bridge & Tunnel Program 5337 Bridge & Tunnel Program 5337 $107,052,220 $85,641,776 $85,641,776  
2025 MBTA031 Bridge & Tunnel Program 5337 Bridge & Tunnel Program LF $107,052,220 $21,410,444   $21,410,444
2025 MBTA032 Revenue Vehicle Program 5337 Revenue Vehicle Program 5337 $33,478,158 $26,782,526 $26,782,526  
2025 MBTA032 Revenue Vehicle Program 5337 Revenue Vehicle Program LF $33,478,158 $6,695,632   $6,695,632
2025 MBTA033 Signals/Systems Upgrade Program  5337 Signals/Systems Upgrade Program 5337 $32,263,810 $25,811,048 $25,811,048  
2025 MBTA033 Signals/Systems Upgrade Program  5337 Signals/Systems Upgrade Program LF $32,263,810 $6,452,762   $6,452,762
2025 MBTA034 Stations and Facilities Program (MBTA) 5337 Stations and Facilities Program 5337 $122,920,211 $98,336,169 $98,336,169  
2025 MBTA034 Stations and Facilities Program (MBTA) 5337 Stations and Facilities Program LF $122,920,211 $24,584,042   $24,584,042
2025 MBTA035 Bus Program 5339 Bus Program 5339 $7,827,270 $6,261,816 $6,261,816  
2025 MBTA035 Bus Program 5339 Bus Program LF $7,827,270 $1,565,454   $1,565,454
2025 MBTA036 RRIF Financing - PTC/ATC/Fiber RRIF Financing - PTC/ATC/Fiber OF $369,064,667 $369,064,667 $369,064,667  
2025 MBTA037 RRIF/TIFIA Financing Program RRIF/TIFIA Financing Program OF $147,500,000 $147,500,000 $147,500,000  
STIP: 2024 - 2028 (D)
Year MassDOT Project ID Program MassDOT Project Description Funding Source Total Project Cost Total Programmed Funds Federal Funds Other Funds
Federal Fiscal Year 2026 $811,066,124 $698,369,965 $112,696,159
Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority $811,066,124 $698,369,965 $112,696,159
2026 MBTA040 Bridge & Tunnel Program 5307 Bridge & Tunnel Program 5307 $32,793,386 $26,234,709 $26,234,709  
2026 MBTA040 Bridge & Tunnel Program 5307 Bridge & Tunnel Program LF $32,793,386 $6,558,677   $6,558,677
2026 MBTA041 Revenue Vehicle Program 5307 Revenue Vehicle Program 5307 $133,056,359 $106,445,087 $106,445,087  
2026 MBTA041 Revenue Vehicle Program 5307 Revenue Vehicle Program LF $133,056,359 $26,611,272   $26,611,272
2026 MBTA042 Signals/Systems Upgrade Program  5307 Signals/Systems Upgrade Program 5307 $47,720,808 $38,176,646 $38,176,646  
2026 MBTA042 Signals/Systems Upgrade Program  5307 Signals/Systems Upgrade Program LF $47,720,808 $9,544,162   $9,544,162
2026 MBTA043 Stations and Facilities Program (MBTA) 5307 Stations and Facilities Program 5307 $39,783,085 $31,826,468 $31,826,468  
2026 MBTA043 Stations and Facilities Program (MBTA) 5307 Stations and Facilities Program LF $39,783,085 $7,956,617   $7,956,617
2026 MBTA044 Bridge & Tunnel Program 5337 Bridge & Tunnel Program 5337 $107,052,220 $85,641,776 $85,641,776  
2026 MBTA044 Bridge & Tunnel Program 5337 Bridge & Tunnel Program LF $107,052,220 $21,410,444   $21,410,444
2026 MBTA045 Revenue Vehicle Program 5337 Revenue Vehicle Program 5337 $39,869,778 $31,895,822 $31,895,822  
2026 MBTA045 Revenue Vehicle Program 5337 Revenue Vehicle Program LF $39,869,778 $7,973,956   $7,973,956
2026 MBTA046 Signals/Systems Upgrade Program  5337 Signals/Systems Upgrade Program 5337 $32,263,809 $25,811,047 $25,811,047  
2026 MBTA046 Signals/Systems Upgrade Program  5337 Signals/Systems Upgrade Program LF $32,263,809 $6,452,762   $6,452,762
2026 MBTA047 Stations and Facilities Program (MBTA) 5337 Stations and Facilities Program 5337 $122,920,211 $98,336,169 $98,336,169  
2026 MBTA047 Stations and Facilities Program (MBTA) 5337 Stations and Facilities Program LF $122,920,211 $24,584,042   $24,584,042
2026 MBTA048 Bus Program 5339 Bus Program 5339 $8,021,135 $6,416,908 $6,416,908  
2026 MBTA048 Bus Program 5339 Bus Program LF $8,021,135 $1,604,227   $1,604,227
2026 MBTA049 RRIF Financing - PTC/ATC/Fiber RRIF Financing - PTC/ATC/Fiber OF $100,085,333 $100,085,333 $100,085,333  
2026 MBTA050 RRIF/TIFIA Financing Program RRIF/TIFIA Financing Program OF $147,500,000 $147,500,000 $147,500,000  
STIP: 2024 - 2028 (D)
Year MassDOT Project ID Program MassDOT Project Description Funding Source Total Project Cost Total Programmed Funds Federal Funds Other Funds
Federal Fiscal Year 2027 $710,980,791 $598,284,632 $112,696,159
Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority $710,980,791 $598,284,632 $112,696,159
2027 MBTA053 Bridge & Tunnel Program 5307 Bridge & Tunnel Program 5307 $32,793,386 $26,234,709 $26,234,709  
2027 MBTA053 Bridge & Tunnel Program 5307 Bridge & Tunnel Program LF $32,793,386 $6,558,677   $6,558,677
2027 MBTA054 Revenue Vehicle Program 5307 Revenue Vehicle Program 5307 $133,056,359 $106,445,087 $106,445,087  
2027 MBTA054 Revenue Vehicle Program 5307 Revenue Vehicle Program LF $133,056,359 $26,611,272   $26,611,272
2027 MBTA055 Signals/Systems Upgrade Program  5307 Signals/Systems Upgrade Program 5307 $47,720,808 $38,176,646 $38,176,646  
2027 MBTA055 Signals/Systems Upgrade Program  5307 Signals/Systems Upgrade Program LF $47,720,808 $9,544,162   $9,544,162
2027 MBTA056 Stations and Facilities Program (MBTA) 5307 Stations and Facilities Program 5307 $39,783,085 $31,826,468 $31,826,468  
2027 MBTA056 Stations and Facilities Program (MBTA) 5307 Stations and Facilities Program LF $39,783,085 $7,956,617   $7,956,617
2027 MBTA057 Bridge & Tunnel Program 5337 Bridge & Tunnel Program 5337 $107,052,220 $85,641,776 $85,641,776  
2027 MBTA057 Bridge & Tunnel Program 5337 Bridge & Tunnel Program LF $107,052,220 $21,410,444   $21,410,444
2027 MBTA058 Revenue Vehicle Program 5337 Revenue Vehicle Program 5337 $39,869,778 $31,895,822 $31,895,822  
2027 MBTA058 Revenue Vehicle Program 5337 Revenue Vehicle Program LF $39,869,778 $7,973,956   $7,973,956
2027 MBTA059 Signals/Systems Upgrade Program  5337 Signals/Systems Upgrade Program 5337 $32,263,809 $25,811,047 $25,811,047  
2027 MBTA059 Signals/Systems Upgrade Program  5337 Signals/Systems Upgrade Program LF $32,263,809 $6,452,762   $6,452,762
2027 MBTA060 Stations and Facilities Program (MBTA) 5337 Stations and Facilities Program 5337 $122,920,211 $98,336,169 $98,336,169  
2027 MBTA060 Stations and Facilities Program (MBTA) 5337 Stations and Facilities Program LF $122,920,211 $24,584,042   $24,584,042
2027 MBTA061 Bus Program 5339 Bus Program 5339 $8,021,135 $6,416,908 $6,416,908  
2027 MBTA061 Bus Program 5339 Bus Program LF $8,021,135 $1,604,227   $1,604,227
2027 MBTA063 RRIF/TIFIA Financing Program RRIF/TIFIA Financing Program OF $147,500,000 $147,500,000 $147,500,000  
STIP: 2024 - 2028 (D)
Year MassDOT Project ID Program MassDOT Project Description Funding Source Total Project Cost Total Programmed Funds Federal Funds Other Funds
Federal Fiscal Year 2028 $710,980,791 $598,284,632 $112,696,159
Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority $710,980,791 $598,284,632 $112,696,159
2028 MBTA011475 Bridge & Tunnel Program 5307 Bridge & Tunnel Program  5307 $32,793,386 $26,234,709 $26,234,709  
2028 MBTA011475 Bridge & Tunnel Program 5307 Bridge & Tunnel Program  LF $32,793,386 $6,558,677   $6,558,677
2028 MBTA011476 Revenue Vehicle Program 5307 Revenue Vehicle Program 5307 $133,056,359 $106,445,087 $106,445,087  
2028 MBTA011476 Revenue Vehicle Program 5307 Revenue Vehicle Program LF $133,056,359 $26,611,272   $26,611,272
2028 MBTA011478 Signals/Systems Upgrade Program  5307 Signals/Systems Upgrade Program 5307 $47,720,808 $38,176,646 $38,176,646  
2028 MBTA011478 Signals/Systems Upgrade Program  5307 Signals/Systems Upgrade Program LF $47,720,808 $9,544,162   $9,544,162
2028 MBTA011481 Bridge & Tunnel Program 5337 Bridge & Tunnel Program 5337 $107,052,220 $85,641,776 $85,641,776  
2028 MBTA011481 Bridge & Tunnel Program 5337 Bridge & Tunnel Program LF $107,052,220 $21,410,444   $21,410,444
2028 MBTA011484 Stations and Facilities Program (MBTA) 5307 Stations and Facilities Program 5307 $39,783,085 $31,826,468 $31,826,468  
2028 MBTA011484 Stations and Facilities Program (MBTA) 5307 Stations and Facilities Program LF $39,783,085 $7,956,617   $7,956,617
2028 MBTA011486 Revenue Vehicle Program 5337 Revenue Vehicle Program 5337 $39,869,778 $31,895,822 $31,895,822  
2028 MBTA011486 Revenue Vehicle Program 5337 Revenue Vehicle Program LF $39,869,778 $7,973,956   $7,973,956
2028 MBTA011487 Signals/Systems Upgrade Program  5337 Signals/Systems Upgrade Program 5337 $32,263,809 $25,811,047 $25,811,047  
2028 MBTA011487 Signals/Systems Upgrade Program  5337 Signals/Systems Upgrade Program LF $32,263,809 $6,452,762   $6,452,762
2028 MBTA011488 Stations and Facilities Program (MBTA) 5337 Stations and Facilities Program 5337 $122,920,211 $98,336,169 $98,336,169  
2028 MBTA011488 Stations and Facilities Program (MBTA) 5337 Stations and Facilities Program LF $122,920,211 $24,584,042   $24,584,042
2028 MBTA011489 Bus Program 5339 Bus Program 5339 $8,021,135 $6,416,908 $6,416,908  
2028 MBTA011489 Bus Program 5339 Bus Program LF $8,021,135 $1,604,227   $1,604,227
2028 MBTA011490 RRIF/TIFIA Financing Program RRIF/TIFIA Financing Program OF $147,500,000 $147,500,000 $147,500,000  

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 3-10: FFYs 2024–28 TIP Transit Table (MWRTA)